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University of Edinburgh (Scottish University)

 Organization

Dates

  • Existence: 1583-present

The University of Edinburgh was established by Royal Charter in 1582. It was originally called Tounis College, when part of a legacy left by Robert Reid, Bishop of Orkney in 1558 had established a college of which the Town Council had gained control to establish a College of Law on the South side of Edinburgh. The inception of the University took place in 1583. In 1617 when King James VI of Scotland (I of England) visited the College it was decreed that the College should change its name to King James' College, although the College continued to use the older title. The first change in the corporate body of the University was not until 1935 when the first merger took place. This was between the Faculty of Divinity of the University of Edinburgh and New College. This was due to the re-union of the Church of Scotland in 1932.The next merger was in 1951 when the Royal (Dick) Veterinary School was reconstituted as part of the University of Edinburgh. The Royal (Dick) Veterinary School achieved full faculty status in 1964. In 1998 Moray House Institute of Education became the Faculty of Education.
The first classes of the university were held in Hamilton House known as the Duke's Lodge. In 1582 a site that included St Mary in the Fields was acquired. Many new buildings and extensions were made to the site of Hamilton House after 1616. Two prominent stages of building for the University were those undertaken by Robert Adam and William Playfair. In 1869 the site next to the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary was acquired. Building on this project was completed by the end of the 19th century. The University today is situated around these areas in the centre of Edinburgh and Kings Buildings and there are also campuses at Holyrood and elsewhere.
Teaching began in 1583 under Robert Rollock, with a four year course in arts to gain a masters of arts. When Rollock was appointed as the first principal of the University, there were four Philosophy regents and one regent of Humanity, whilst Rollock specialized in Divinity. Until the beginning of the 18th century the University remained essentially an Arts College, with a Divinity School attached. Throughout the 17th century the Chairs of Divinity, Oriental Languages, Ecclesiastical History and Mathematics had been created. By the end of the 17th century there was also regular teaching in Medicine, and sporadic teaching in Law. The University was at the centre of European Enlightenment in the 18th century. By 1722 a Faculty of Law had been established. The first medical Chair had been established in 1685 and was closely followed in the first half of the 18th century by six more. Four more medical Chairs were created in the 19th century. New Chairs in other Faculties were not established after 1760 until the latter half of the 19th century when they followed in rapid succession, continuing in the 20th century, which include those produced by the mergers with New College, the Royal (Dick) Veterinary School and Moray House Institute of Education.
The University was governed by the town council until the Universities (Scotland) Act of 1858, when it received self governing status. The archaic teaching and management system of regents was abolished in 1708. The 1858 act dramatically changed the constitution of the University. A University Court and General Council were introduced which decided on matters and management pertaining to the whole University. The Senatus Academicus was already in place before 1858and this managed academic matters, but answered to the Court and Council. This system is still used.
The University of Edinburgh provides validation for a Master of Fine Arts that has run jointly with Edinburgh College of Art since 1943. A joint chair, the Hood Chair of Mining Engineering was established in 1923 with Heriot-Watt College which became Heriot-Watt University.
In 2002, the structure of the university was altered substantially, with the abolition of Faculties and the creation of the College of Humanities & Social Science, the College of Medicine & Veterinary Medicine and the College of Science & Engineering. Departments were replaced by Schools within each Faculty.

Found in 11 Collections and/or Records:

Correspondence: from Duncan M Irvine to Alfred John Jukes-Browne, 1865-1899

 Sub-Series
Identifier: Coll-74/12/7
Scope and Contents The Correspondence: from Duncan M Irvine to Alfred John Jukes-Browne sub-series consists of:
  1. 44 letters, alphabetically arranged (1865-1899)

General: 1953-1954, 1953-1954

 Sub-Series
Identifier: BAI 1/17/35
Scope and Contents Correspondence and related items, including letters from Mona Anderson, Reinhold Niebuhr, Hachiro Yuasa and Lazlo Pap. Includes material relating to the Donald Macpherson Baillie's estate, the unveiling of war memorial panels and installation of the Duke of Edinburgh as Chancellor at the University of Edinburgh, the coronation of Elizabeth II and preparations for the World Council of Churches conference.

Letter to James Cossar Ewart from Edwin Ray Lankester, 30 March 1882

 Item
Identifier: Coll-14/9/1/11
Scope and Contents Lankester thanks Ewart for his congratulations upon gaining the Professorship of Natural History at the University of Edinburgh. He suggests they should arrange a meeting, as 'there are schemes in the air which we must keep an eye on'.

Letter to James Cossar Ewart from Richard Quain, 16 December 1878

 Item
Identifier: Coll-14/9/1/8
Scope and Contents Quain congratulates Ewart on the news of his professorship at the University of Edinburgh. He offers Ewart advice on the 'art' of delivering a lecture, stressing the importance of elocution and the use of language.

Letter to James Cossar Ewart from Sir Edward Albert Sharpey Schafer, 28 March 1915

 Item
Identifier: Coll-14/9/21/7
Scope and Contents Schafer writes that they ought to come to a decision about the directorship as soon as possible, and that Ewart was to have written a proposed scheme. He emphasises that the Committee would push for a full time director and doubts if the University would relieve Ewart of his duties sufficiently to allow him to take over the directorship.

Papers of John Baillie, 1900-1964

 Sub-Fonds
Identifier: BAI 1
Scope and Contents school and university notes; awards and achievements; lectures, addresses and broadcasts; sermons and prayers; manuscripts of published works; papers relating to the World Council of Churches, British Council of Churches, General Assembly of the Church of Scotland and other organisations; personal and professional correspondence

Papers relating to Donald Macpherson Baillie, 1908-1961

 Series
Identifier: BAI 7
Scope and Contents The papers relating to Donald Macpherson Baillie consist of:
  1. articles, cuttings and ephemera
  2. career/employment resum├ęs and references
  3. correspondence
  4. memorials and letters of condolence

Papers relating to Peter Baillie, c1910-1914

 Series
Identifier: BAI 8
Scope and Contents The papers relating to Peter Baillie consist of:
  1. certificates
  2. correspondence
  3. documents relating to memorial service
  4. poetry and songs
  5. press cuttings

The Figurative Language of Jesus in its significance for the Investigation of Inner Life, by Heinrich Weinel, c1908

 Item
Identifier: BAI 1/3/21
Scope and Contents An essay written by John Baillie as a student at the University of Edinburgh or New College, introducing and there after containing the inaugural address by Heinrich Weinel on being appointed lecturer at the University of Bonn in 1900.