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University of Edinburgh (Scottish University)

 Organization

Dates

  • Existence: 1583-present

The University of Edinburgh was established by Royal Charter in 1582. It was originally called Tounis College, when part of a legacy left by Robert Reid, Bishop of Orkney in 1558 had established a college of which the Town Council had gained control to establish a College of Law on the South side of Edinburgh. The inception of the University took place in 1583. In 1617 when King James VI of Scotland (I of England) visited the College it was decreed that the College should change its name to King James' College, although the College continued to use the older title. The first change in the corporate body of the University was not until 1935 when the first merger took place. This was between the Faculty of Divinity of the University of Edinburgh and New College. This was due to the re-union of the Church of Scotland in 1932.The next merger was in 1951 when the Royal (Dick) Veterinary School was reconstituted as part of the University of Edinburgh. The Royal (Dick) Veterinary School achieved full faculty status in 1964. In 1998 Moray House Institute of Education became the Faculty of Education.
The first classes of the university were held in Hamilton House known as the Duke's Lodge. In 1582 a site that included St Mary in the Fields was acquired. Many new buildings and extensions were made to the site of Hamilton House after 1616. Two prominent stages of building for the University were those undertaken by Robert Adam and William Playfair. In 1869 the site next to the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary was acquired. Building on this project was completed by the end of the 19th century. The University today is situated around these areas in the centre of Edinburgh and Kings Buildings and there are also campuses at Holyrood and elsewhere.
Teaching began in 1583 under Robert Rollock, with a four year course in arts to gain a masters of arts. When Rollock was appointed as the first principal of the University, there were four Philosophy regents and one regent of Humanity, whilst Rollock specialized in Divinity. Until the beginning of the 18th century the University remained essentially an Arts College, with a Divinity School attached. Throughout the 17th century the Chairs of Divinity, Oriental Languages, Ecclesiastical History and Mathematics had been created. By the end of the 17th century there was also regular teaching in Medicine, and sporadic teaching in Law. The University was at the centre of European Enlightenment in the 18th century. By 1722 a Faculty of Law had been established. The first medical Chair had been established in 1685 and was closely followed in the first half of the 18th century by six more. Four more medical Chairs were created in the 19th century. New Chairs in other Faculties were not established after 1760 until the latter half of the 19th century when they followed in rapid succession, continuing in the 20th century, which include those produced by the mergers with New College, the Royal (Dick) Veterinary School and Moray House Institute of Education.
The University was governed by the town council until the Universities (Scotland) Act of 1858, when it received self governing status. The archaic teaching and management system of regents was abolished in 1708. The 1858 act dramatically changed the constitution of the University. A University Court and General Council were introduced which decided on matters and management pertaining to the whole University. The Senatus Academicus was already in place before 1858and this managed academic matters, but answered to the Court and Council. This system is still used.
The University of Edinburgh provides validation for a Master of Fine Arts that has run jointly with Edinburgh College of Art since 1943. A joint chair, the Hood Chair of Mining Engineering was established in 1923 with Heriot-Watt College which became Heriot-Watt University.
In 2002, the structure of the university was altered substantially, with the abolition of Faculties and the creation of the College of Humanities & Social Science, the College of Medicine & Veterinary Medicine and the College of Science & Engineering. Departments were replaced by Schools within each Faculty.

Found in 12 Collections and/or Records:

Class notes - Lectures on Agriculture and Entemology, given by Professor Wallace and Dr. Fream

 Fonds
Identifier: Coll-1283
Scope and Contents This volume in typescript contains careful notes on these two series of lectures at the University of Edinburgh. The first series, by Professor Robert Wallace (1853-1939), Chair of Agriculture, covers dairying, with extensive coverage of the different types of cheese and their production. The second, by Dr. William Fream, covers agricultural entomology, essentially the varieties of pests that attack crops. There are ink drawings throughout. Spine-title and title-page both indicate...

Engineering notes of Dr. Russell A. Leather, Edinburgh University student, graduating 1952

 Fonds
Identifier: Coll-1421
Scope and Contents The content of the 1st and 2nd year engineering note-books (laboratory books) of Dr. Russell A. Leather reflect the wide approach in studies which covered mechanical devices, steel structures and electrical technology. The books include graphwork, drawings, and photographs of late-1940s laboratory equipment at Kings Buildings (1948-1949). Photographs feature the 'Riehle' testing machine', the 'Adie' cement testing machine, a torsion testing machine, the 'Ambler' compression machine, the 'Olsen'...

Law notes of Professor Hector MacQueen

 Fonds
Identifier: Coll-1256
Scope and Contents The collection is composed of lecture notes, essays, copies of cases, copies of exam papers, off-prints and other material relating to the following courses (and course components) offered by the then Faculty of Law, Edinburgh University: History of Scots Law Scottish Legal System Scots Law I and II Conduct of Proof / Inquiry Contract ...

Lecture notes of John R. Barclay, student 1946-1950

 Fonds
Identifier: Coll-1401
Scope and Contents 2 notebooks which are: 1 x MS notes on Meteorology, noted on fore-pages with 'John R. Barclay' with address in Edinburgh, and '1948'. The notes were taken from the lectures of James Paton during 1947-1948. 1 x MS notes on Biblical Studies 1950-1951, noted on fore-pages with 'John R. Barclay' with address in Edinburgh. The notes were taken from the lectures of Rev. Dr. D.M.G. Stalker and from...

Lecture notes on Midwifery (Professor Thomas Young, 1726-1783), taken down by James Johnson

 Fonds
Identifier: Coll-1254
Scope and Contents The material consists of Young's Lectures - spine title - being lectures on Midwifery given by Professor Thomas Young. It is dated July 1775. The introductory page notes the content as Lectures on Midwifery by Thos. Young. Professor of Midwifery in Edinburgh. The inside front board has bookplate noted as: James Johnson / Student at Edinburgh. Another notes in ink that the item was: Presented to the Library by Christopher Johnson....

Lecture notes on Midwifery (Professor Thomas Young, 1726-1783), taken down by person unknown

 Fonds
Identifier: Coll-1253
Scope and Contents The material consists of Young's Midwifery - spine title - being lectures on Midwifery given by Professor Thomas Young. There is no identifiable date. The introductory page notes the content as Lectures on Midwifery by Thos. Young M.D. Professor of Midwifery in the University of Edinburgh There are two volumes, with Volume 1 containing 403 pp. numbered and a contents list, and Volume 2 containing 409 pp. numbered. There...

Lecture notes on Midwifery (Professor Thomas Young, 1726-1783), taken down by person unknown

 Fonds
Identifier: Coll-1252
Scope and Contents The material consists of Young's Midwifery - spine title - being lectures on Midwifery given by Professor Thomas Young. There is no identifiable date. The introductory page notes the content as Dr. Young's Theory and Practice of Midwifery

There are 338 pp. relating to the subject, and a contents list at rear.

There is no indication of the name of the note-taking student.

Notes of lectures given by Alexander Monro (secundus), taken down by unknown person(s)

 Fonds
Identifier: Coll-1325
Scope and Contents This volume of notes is based on Monro's surgical lectures at Edinburgh Medical School, 1774-1775. The manuscript lectures are sub-headed Lectures 1-13 and are in two distinct hands - the first two lectures in one, and the rest in another. The paper is watermarked with a crown and the initials GR, undated, but this L.V.Gerrevink paper commonly used throughout much of the 18th century. Both hands are clear and legible, with just a few corrections, and occasional additions written on the verso of...

Notes of lectures given by Dr. E. B. Jamieson

 Fonds
Identifier: Coll-1350
Scope and Contents The collection consists of two volumes of manuscript notes from the classes of 'Regional Anatomy', 1934-1935, and numbered Volume II and Volume III:
  1. - Volume II is concerned with the 'Thorax and brain'
  2. - Volume III is concerned with the 'Head and neck'

Notes of Lectures of Professor Crum Brown, taken down by George Burns

 Fonds
Identifier: Coll-1251
Scope and Contents The two volumes forming the collection contain a set of notes on Professor Crum Brown's lectures taken in Winter Session 1892-3 by George Burns (then residing in Grange Road, Edinburgh), in a clear and legible hand. The volumes are labelled on first pages as; Chemistry 1; and, Chemistry 2. They are stamped on the spine as 'Note Book' and on the front boards with the University badge.