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Carmichael, Alexander, 1832-1912 (Excise officer | folklorist and antiquarian | Edinburgh | Scotland)

 Person

Alexander Carmichael, folklorist, antiquarian, and author, was born on 1 December 1832 in Taylochan, Lismore, ninth and youngest child of Hugh Carmichael (1783-1862), farmer and publican, and Elizabeth (Betty) MacColl (1791-1863). After attending schools on the island and, apparently, in Greenock, Carmichael entered the civil service as an exciseman, serving in Greenock and Dublin before stints in Islay and Carbost, Skye. There he joined the team of pioneering folklorists collecting tales for the four-volume Popular tales of the West Highlands (1860-1862) compiled under the auspices of the tireless polymath John Francis Campbell (1821-1885). The principles of 'storyology' inculcated by Campbell - the necessity of recording the performance accurately, accompanied by details concerning the informant - exerted a fundamental influence upon his collecting for the rest of his life. Nevertheless, such principles clashed with Carmichael's own artistic, spiritual, and idealistic cast of mind, his desire to redeem Gaels and their traditions from the odium of outsiders and the perceived hostility of the evangelical church, and his belief that it was his duty not only to record the present, but also to retrieve and reconstruct a glorious Gaelic past.
Following a two-year interlude working in Cornwall, Carmichael returned north at the end of 1864. This time, probably on his own request, he was assigned to the Uists. His new post, initially based in Lochmaddy, allowed him to undertake arduous journeys through some of the richest areas for folklore in western Europe, scribbling down in a series of field notebooks an extraordinary range of material ranging from long Fenian tales and ballads, through historical narratives, songs, hymns, and charms, to anecdotes, observations, proverbs, riddles, and unusual words. In addition, the influence and encouragement of the surveyor and antiquarian Capt. F.W.L. Thomas focussed Carmichael's attention upon archaeological sites in the Hebrides, and their associated traditions. Although Carmichael had to rein back on his collecting expeditions following his marriage to Mary Frances MacBean (1841-1928) in January 1868, and the births of their four children Alexander (Alec) (1868-1941), Elizabeth (Ella) (1871-1928), Eoghan (1878-1966), and Iain (1878-1928), the family's house at Creagorry, close by the inn where people would wait until the South Ford between Benbecula and South Uist could be crossed, meant that he could still gather much material from passers-by.
From 1873 Carmichael was able to experiment with presenting in print some of the lore he had collected, through his position as Uist correspondent for the Highlander, the radical crofting newspaper edited by John Murdoch (1818-1903), whom he had first met when they worked together in Dublin some fifteen years previously. He was increasingly preoccupied, however, with the idea of compiling a series of volumes on the environment, history, and culture of the Outer Hebrides, working up for the general public the vast store of material he had gleaned throughout the islands. Such an ambitious project would require considerably more leisure than he could afford in his exacting position. Carmichael's attempt to secure Bhàlaigh farm in North Uist for this purpose met with a rebuff from the estate; this, coupled with his increasing disillusion regarding the somewhat philistine 'Uist gentry', as well as the need to ensure a better education for his children, made him move to Oban. After a wearisome couple of years there, spurning the Revenue's offer of a prestigious and better-paid post in London, in 1880 Carmichael returned to Uist, taking a substantial pay cut in the process. There, in Scolpaig, he finished writing an appendix concerning Hebridean land customs for the third volume of Celtic Scotland (1876-1880), the magnum opus of the Historiographer Royal William Forbes Skene (1809-92). In 1882 he once more left Uist, this time for Edinburgh, where he was to spend the rest of his life.
The liveliness of Carmichael's agrestic descriptions caught the eye of Francis, Lord Napier (1819-98) - indeed, he later credited the piece with first inspiring in him an interest in Highland affairs. Carmichael was requested by Napier to contribute two similar appendices for the Report of the Crofting Commission (1884). Rather to his alarm, however, Carmichael insisted on including a number of Gaelic songs and hymns in his work in order to illustrate the grace and refinement of Hebridean crofters. Although Carmichael's leanings towards spirituality were by no means latent previously, his interest in the subject had doubtless been heightened both as a result of ongoing study he was undertaking concerning the place-names of Iona, drawing upon his comprehensive work on the toponymy of Uist and Barra for the Ordnance Survey, and also the fact that, having lived among the islanders for many years, he was now in a position to gather private and personal as well as more ostensibly public lore. Carmichael's appendices in the Report proved exceptionally popular, an uncontroversial oasis in an exceptionally contentious volume. This, and the enthusiastic reception accorded a further paper on 'Uist old hymns' (1888), encouraged Carmichael to embark upon a much larger work on the subject.
During the final decade of the nineteenth century, Carmichael, now in retirement, further consolidated his position not only as doyen of Edinburgh's Gaelic intellectual community, but also as a crucial player in Scotland's Celtic Renaissance, for instance in his contributions to the seminal journal Evergreen (1895-6) edited by Patrick Geddes (1854-1932). These circles, in which scholarly interests interacted with contemporary artistic movements, exerted a major influence on Alexander Carmichael's greatest and most enduring work, the two volumes of Carmina Gadelica (1900). Encouraged and advised by his protégé the scholar George Henderson (1866-1912), though with the rather more sceptical counsel of fellow folklorists such as Father Allan MacDonald (1859-1905), Carmichael compiled and edited a substantial collection of sacred pieces, hymns, and charms, expressedly intended to illustrate the refined spirituality, the crepuscular rhapsodic mysticism, the visionary qualities of the people among whom he had lived for nearly two decades. With the help of the publisher Walter Biggar Blaikie (1847-1928), and of his daughter Ella, Carmichael was able to fashion a landmark in Scottish publishing, a stately, sumptuously produced magnum opus, whose illustrations (by his wife) and hand-made paper were surely intended to recall early Christian manuscripts, to represent to the reader the original numinous experience of hearing the original chants and lays.
Despite the enthusiastic response of most reviewers to the Carmina Gadelica, and notwithstanding that he was awarded an honorary LL.D. by the University of Edinburgh in 1906, scholarly doubts soon surfaced concerning the editing techniques employed. It is clear from Carmichael's manuscripts that he was prepared to hone, polish, even rewrite substantial portions of his original material before publishing, smoothing metre, cadence, and rhyme, heightening and refining language, adding esoteric referents, even introducing obscure vocabulary in order to enhance the impact which the hymns and charms - and indeed the quotations from the informants themselves - would exert upon the reader of the Carmina Gadelica. Although Carmichael continued to collect lore for the rest of his life - many of his new informants were mainland contacts of his son-in-law the Gaelic scholar William J. Watson (1865-1948) - it is noteworthy that he did not see the further volumes he originally envisaged through the press. It was left to his daughter Ella to bring out a new edition of the first two books of the Carmina in 1928, with a third and fourth volume, edited by his grandson James Carmichael Watson (1910-1942), appearing in 1940-1941.
Although later scholars have cast some doubt on the editing practices he employed in the creation of the Carmina Gadelica, Carmichael's great work, and his manuscript collection as a whole, remain an indispensable treasure-trove, the fruits of a lifetime spent selflessly in the service of his own people, gathering, preserving, communicating and interpreting Gaelic culture, tradition, and lore for the wider world and for future generations. Alexander Carmichael died in Edinburgh on 6 June 1912, and is buried at St Moluag's on his native island of Lismore.
Professor William John Watson died in 1948. His son, James Carmichael Watson, born in 1910, and successor to his father as Professor of Celtic at Edinburgh University in 1938, contributed to later volumes of Carmina Gadelica . James Carmichael Watson died, missing in action, in 1942.

Found in 113 Collections and/or Records:

Field notebook belonging to Alexander Carmichael, 2 September 1870 to 7 October 1875

 Series
Identifier: Coll-97/CW106
Scope and Contents Field notebook belonging to Alexander Carmichael. Written on the inside front cover is '2/9 1870. Oban' and on the flyleaf is '[deleted: Twas] Friday 2 Sep[tember]. 1870. 12 noon from Ob[an]'. Folios 1-3r and 75r to 117v are blank. The text on folio 3v and 4r and 4v is written updside down and is later text (29 January 1875). The contents are in two distinct sections, the first being material collected on Lios Mòr/Lismore and the second being material collected in South Uist. Much of the...

Field notebook belonging to Alexander Carmichael, 1864 to

 Series
Identifier: Coll-97/CW114
Scope and Contents Field notebook belonging to Alexander Carmichael, noted as being 'Bought at St Columb, Cornwall, 30 Nov[ember] 1864 pr[ice] 2/3'. The back inside cover contains a note probably collected as part of excise duties which reads 'Rod[erick] MacPhie Mast of boat 21.8 [-] 1.2½ [-]'. The notebook contains one insertion. The majority of the notebook contains lore relating to Miùlaigh/Mingulay mostly collected from Roderick MacNeil, crofter, aged 88, known as Ruairidh an Rùma. Roderick MacNeil also...

Field notebook belonging to Alexander Carmichael, 1887

 Series
Identifier: Coll-97/CW89
Scope and Contents Field notebook belonging to Alexander Carmichael probably while he lived at 31, Raeburn Place, Edinburgh, as this address is written in ink on the first folio. Written on the inside front cover but heavily scored is text which reads 'Mrs Malcolm MacLeod, [- Islay], widow of Mal[colm] MacLeod [Loch-]. The majority of the notebook contains material collected from Donald Currie, crofter, Ìle/ Islay relating folklore and natural history about the birds, fish, shellfish and animals found in and...

Field notebook belonging to Alexander Carmichael, c1872-1893

 Series
Identifier: Coll-97/CW126f
Scope and Contents Field notebook belonging to Alexander Carmichael. The marjority of the notebook relates to material collected in Earra Ghàidheal/Argyllshire but there are a number of loose leaves at the end which contain an account of a journey from Uibhist/Uist through An t-Eilean Sgitheanach/Isle of Skye, during which time his wife, Mary is in Edinburgh and is pregnant. There are eight blank folios at the end of the notebook. Much of the material in this notebook was collected from Duncan...

Field notebook of Alexander Carmichael, 1870 to 1872

 Series
Identifier: Coll-97/CW90
Scope and Contents Field notebook belonging to Alexander Carmichael containing the stories 'Rocabarrai' and 'Cugarbhad'; some songs and song fragments; customs relating to religious festivals, particularly on the Isle of Barra; stories about the MacNeil of Barra; stories and archaeological notes on Castle Beagram [Caisteal Bheagram, Uibhist a Deas/South Uist]; cattle charms and stories about the Lochlannaich [Vikings]. As well as archaeological notes on chapels and cemeteries the majority of the notebook entries...

Field notebook of Alexander Carmichael, 1874, 1877 and 1891

 Series
Identifier: Coll-97/CW108
Scope and Contents Notebook belonging to Alexander Carmichael containing songs, poems, tales, names, vocabulary and expressions collected in the Outer Hebrides [Na h-Eileanan an Iar]. The first part of the volume contains transcriptions taken as Carmichael listened to informants in 1877 while the second part appears to be copies of previous transcriptions of material collected by Carmichael and Rev Malcolm MacPhail in 1874 and written into the notebook in 1891. Amongst the material is a version of the lament...

Field notebook of Alexander Carmichael, 1873

 Series
Identifier: Coll-97/CW115
Scope and Contents Field notebook belonging to Alexander Carmichael principally containing material collected on Eilean Leòdhais/ Isle of Lewis. The main informants were Angus Gunn and his daughter Ann MacDonald from Dail bho Thuath/North Dell and Dail bho Dheas/South Dell respectively, who sang songs relating to Christmas and explained associated customs. They also told Carmichael stories about the temples found around Nis/Ness and about St Ronan. In addition, the notebook contains notes on winter customs,...

Field notebook of Alexander Carmichael, 1883 to 1887

 Series
Identifier: Coll-97/CW120
Scope and Contents Field notebook belonging to Alexander Carmichael containing material collected mostly in An Apainn/Appin and Lios Mòr/Lismore, Earra Ghàidheal/Argyllshire. A large proportion of the stories and biographical information about Appin was collected from Donald MacColl, foxhunter, Glencreran, who was known as Dòmhnall a' Bhrocair. Amongst the material collected from Dòmhnall a' Bhrocair are proverbs, sayings, customs, stories about local figures and families and historic anecdotes. The other main...

Fragment of a poem beginning 'Is mithich dhuinn nis bhi triall' and accompanying note, June 1887

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW89/146
Scope and Contents Fragment of a poem beginning 'Is mithich dhuinn nis bhi triall, As Barra Chrian nach d fhas pailt' and accompanying note which reads 'Sligean [shell] used for drinking Creachain used on Sunday in on top of Ruaival by Prof Blackie Mr Jolly + self.'

Indistinct note possibly relating to excise collection, c1865

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW113/38
Scope and Contents Indistinct note possibly relating to excise collection which reads 'June 6 [ep] 8 A. A. C., 6 up 9 A. A. C' [A.A.C. being Alexander Archibald Carmichael].