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Sayings

 Subject
Subject Source: Sss
Scope Note: Created For = CW

Found in 12 Collections and/or Records:

Custom and saying entitled 'Spilling Milk', 1895

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/60
Scope and Contents Custom and saying recorded by John Ewen MacRury, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula entitled 'Spilling Milk' describing how if someone spilt milk they would say 'Coma libh dheth tha bial feumach a feathamh air' [It doesn't matter, there's a needy mouth waiting for it] and that the thirsty party would get their thirst quenched. Text has been scored thorugh as if transcribed elsewhere.

Five sayings used to wish people well, 8 March 1895

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/93
Scope and Contents Five sayings written down by John Ewen MacRury, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula used to wish people well including a saying 'used when giving medicine to man or beast suffering from lingering disease.' The first saying begins 'Cluig slainte, cnaimh t-anochair'; the second 'Seachd sonais nan seachd rath air gach mac 'us nighean'; the third begins 'Uisge craonabhoineach geal'; the fourth 'Grian an cridhe na h' aird' and the final one 'Doinnean air aghaidh a chuain mhoir'.

Fragment of a poem or sayings entitled 'Bailgfhionn' [white-bellied calf], 1895

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/96
Scope and Contents Fragment of a poem or sayings written down by John Ewen MacRury in ink entitled 'Bailgfhionn' [white-bellied calf] which reads 'Laoigh Bhailfhionn an t seann-duine call codach, Laoigh Bhailgfhionn an duine oig cur ann codach.'

List of sayings under the heading 'Serpents', 1895

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/80
Scope and Contents List of sayings under the heading 'Serpents' written down by John Ewen MacRury, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula containing six sayings related to snakes. The text has been scored through in pencil as if transcribed elsewhere.

Note entitled 'Nine, Naodh', 14 January 1895

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/71
Scope and Contents Note written down by John Ewen MacRury, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula entitled 'Nine, Naodh' describing how the fairies are said to be 'nine nines of years sucking the breast' and the same number of years each at boyhood, young hood, middle manhood, old manhood and at 'the bre[a]st of death "ri uchd bais"'.

Notebook belonging to Alexander Carmichael, 12 September 1890 to 1895

 Series
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1
Scope and Contents Notebook belonging to Alexander Carmichael but also used by John Ewen MacRury. The front cover bears a sticker which reads 'Gaelic Notes 1894-5. (Collection of traditions, tales, etc. by Alexander Carmichael (?). Many pages cancelled, indicating publication.) [Carmichael Watson Collection]'. The flyleaf reads 'Gaelic Notes, 1894-5' and the rear flyleaf contains a jotting which reads 'Wishing Guidhe'. The beginning of the notebook contains field notes made by Carmichael in Uibhist a Deas/South...

'Old Phrase' which reads 'An callach glucamach stucannach stachannach', 1894

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/53
Scope and Contents 'Old Phrase' written down by John Ewen MacRury, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula which reads 'An callach glucamach stucannach stachannach'.

Poem beginning 'Coin air loina', 1895

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/63
Scope and Contents Poem writte down by John Ewen MacRury, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula beginning 'Coin air loina, Eich air thaoda'. Text has been scored through in pencil.

Saying beginning 'Aona godhar deug ghiorlagach ghearlagach ghoirleagach', 1894

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/54
Scope and Contents Saying written down by John Ewen MacRury, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula beginning 'Aona godhar deug ghiorlagach ghearlagach ghoirleagach'. The saying appears to be a tongue-twister involving animals and people. The text has been scored through in pencil and it looks as if Alexander Carmichael has altered the 'chalmana' to 'chalamana'.

Vocabulary note about the word 'Bralosgadh' and accompanying poem, 1895

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/100
Scope and Contents Vocabulary note written down by John Ewen MacRury, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula about the word 'Bralosgadh' describing it as 'a great heap of every sort of fuel or combustibles collected on an eminence on marriage occasions or on the coming of age of Chiefs'. He states that 'bonfire' is the closest word to it he knows and as an example of its use gives a saying and a poem, which begins 'Nuair a chaidh iad do'n ghleann, 'sa leag iad damh sheang'.