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Photographs

 Subject
Subject Source: Library of Congress Subject Headings
Scope Note: Created For = NAHSTE

Found in 288 Collections and/or Records:

Letter to James Cossar Ewart from John Walter Gregory, 29 January 1929

 Item
Identifier: Coll-14/9/35/3
Scope and Contents Gregory writes that he is interested in the photographs Ewart sent him. He imagines that hairs and scales probably arose from different types of papillae and that the hair developed between the scales and gradually replaced them as the animals required more thermal protection.
Dates: 29 January 1929

Letter to James Cossar Ewart from Joseph Griffiths with enclosed photograph, 12 August 1913

 Item
Identifier: Coll-14/9/19/39
Scope and Contents Griffiths writes that the letter Ewart sent to the meeting of veterinary surgeons was very useful and makes some observations regarding horse breeding.

The photograph depicts a man and a horse, labelled a Red Buck Martinet, outside some stable doors.
Dates: 12 August 1913

Letter to James Cossar Ewart from Lady Estella Mary Hope, 13 January 1902

 Item
Identifier: Coll-14/9/8/1
Scope and Contents Hope thanks Ewart for the photographs of the Przewalski's foals. She hopes to be able to see them when Arthur Cecil takes them to Woburn. She also mentions the Basuto pony that was sold at a Manchester auctioneer's the previous year, and belonged to a Mr Hardacre from South Africa.
Dates: 13 January 1902

Letter to James Cossar Ewart from Lieutenant E.D.A Daly, 21 May 1901

 Item
Identifier: Coll-14/9/7/13
Scope and Contents Daly writes regarding Ewart's recent request in the Veterinarian for notes and photographs of zebra skins. He explains that among the tame Burchell's zebras running around at Cecil Rhodes' home near Rondebosch, there is a mare with very unusual markings. He suggests photographing the animal for Ewart if he is interested.
Dates: 21 May 1901

Letter to James Cossar Ewart from Lord Arthur Cecil, 05 September 1896

 Item
Identifier: Coll-14/9/2/14
Scope and Contents Cecil thanks Ewart for 'the photo of Mulatto and Romulus' (Ewart's first zebra/horse hybrid and dam) and mentions that the Scottish Farmer should be sending 'Reid of Wishaw' (Charles Reid, the photographer). Cecil suggests that Reid should photograph Ewart's various animals (zebra, mule, donkey as well as Mulatto and Romulus) to highlight the differences in stripes between father and son, and the absence of stripes in the non-hybrid animals.
Dates: 05 September 1896

Letter to James Cossar Ewart from Lord Arthur Cecil, 23 February 1898

 Item
Identifier: Coll-14/9/4/4
Scope and Contents Cecil thanks Ewart for sending photographs and his paper. He goes on to complain of losing 7 mares and 11 foals the previous year to the strongylus parasite.
Dates: 23 February 1898

Letter to James Cossar Ewart from Magnus Spence, 30 March 1903

 Item
Identifier: Coll-14/9/9/39
Scope and Contents Spence states that he is enclosing a photograph of a bird believed to be a cross between a goose and a swan (photograph not present). He states he will let Ewart know if it should happen to breed with a goose.
Dates: 30 March 1903

Letter to James Cossar Ewart from Matthew Horace Hayes, 22 March 1902

 Item
Identifier: Coll-14/9/8/23
Scope and Contents Hayes requests photographs of Connemara ponies for the third edition of Points of the Horse which he is preparing.
Dates: 22 March 1902

Letter to James Cossar Ewart from Matthew Horace Hayes, 29 March 1902

 Item
Identifier: Coll-14/9/8/27
Scope and Contents Hayes replies to Ewart's invitation to visit him at Penicuik, stating that is able to put his research to one side in order to make the trip. He adds that the Duke of Bedford has given him the opportunity to take photographs of his Przewalski's horses, some of which he intends to send on to Ewart.
Dates: 29 March 1902

Letter to James Cossar Ewart from Matthew Horace Hayes, 16 May 1902

 Item
Identifier: Coll-14/9/8/37
Scope and Contents Hayes announces that due to the bad weather he will be unable to come and photograph Ewart's animals for another week or two.
Dates: 16 May 1902