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Manuscripts, Medieval -- England

 Subject
Subject Source: Library of Congress Subject Headings
Scope Note: Medieval Manuscripts created in England.

Found in 74 Collections and/or Records:

Statuta Anglie [lost during WWII], 14th century

 Item
Identifier: MS 157
Scope and Contents

This manuscript was lost during the Second World War. It was a 14th-century English manuscript in vellum, written in Latin and in French, which contained a list of medieval statutes and other laws issued by the Kingdom of England before the development of the English Parliament. A more detailed description can be found in Catherine Borland's catalogue (1916): MS 157 (external link).

Dates: 14th century

Summa Super Titulis Decretalium [incomplete], by Geoffrey of Trani, 14th century

 Item
Identifier: MS 140
Contents This manuscript contains a section of a text by 13th century Italian jurist, Geoffrey of Trani. The text found in part in MS 140 is Trani's most famous work, theSumma super titulis decretalium. It is a summary of the Decretals of Gregory IX, an extremely influential text on canon law produced under the direction of Pope Gregory IX in the 1230s, a few decades before the career of Geoffrey of Trani. The copy of Trani's work...
Dates: 14th century
f. 1r
f. 1r

The Regiment of Princes, by Thomas Hoccleve, 15th century

 Item
Identifier: MS 202
Contents Thomas Hoccleve was a English poet and goverment clerk in the Office of the Privy Seal in the first quarter of the 15th century. Hoccleve was author of several other works, but that contained in MS 202 is his 'Regiment of Princes', dedicated to Prince Henry, the future king Henry V. Given that the poem is dedicated to Henry V as 'Prince', and from some internal evidence in the poem, it is possible to date the composition of Hoccleve's original 'Regiment of Princes' to c. 1410-1413. MS 202 is...
Dates: 15th century
f. 49r
f. 49r

Works on Latin prosody by John Seward, c 1410-1422

 Item
Identifier: MS 136
Scope and Contents MS 136 is a volume of works by the fifteenth-century London schoolmaster, John Seward (or Seguarde). Seward wrote about a dozen short treatises on Latin prosody during the reigns of Henry IV and Henry V, and these works were primarly known and examined in a manuscript of Merton College, Oxford, thought to be unique. However, examination of MS 136 reveals that the Merton manuscript is a slightly later, and finer copy of the original text contained in MS 136. In fact, MS 136 is most probably...
Dates: c 1410-1422