Skip to main content

Social Interaction

 Subject
Subject Source: Local sources
Scope Note: Created For = NAHSTE

Found in 7 Collections and/or Records:

Letter to James Cossar Ewart from Matthew Horace Hayes, 09 December 1902

 Item
Identifier: Coll-14/9/8/111
Scope and Contents Hayes enquires how he could get a copy of Ewart's paper about 'Callosities and the wartless pony'. He also would like to know whether the breed Equus caballus came directly from North America or through its ancestors pliohippus or protohippus. He mentions a paper that Professor William Ridgeway has sent him on the origin of the thoroughbred horse. He also invites Ewart to visit him for hunting.
Dates: 09 December 1902

Letter to James Cossar Ewart from Sir William Ridgeway, 15 September 1904

 Item
Identifier: Coll-14/9/10/102
Scope and Contents Ridgeway congratulates Ewart on the announcement of his marriage. He reports that he has finally got a photograph of the Somali wild ass in Regent's Park from Dando. He mentions forthcoming papers about quaggas from Pocock and Lydekker and concludes by enquiring whether the quagga's markings and its bay colour are to be attributed to its living under the same climactic conditions as the Libyan horse.
Dates: 15 September 1904

Letter to James Cossar Ewart from Sir William Ridgeway, 06 October 1903

 Item
Identifier: Coll-14/9/9/110
Scope and Contents Ridgeway asks if there is a chance of seeing Ewart in Cambridge before his University session begins in October. He reports that his book has gone to press and that he has incorporated the results of Ewart's experiments with the Kiang horse. He reports on his visit to Southport for a British Association for the Advancement of Science meeting.
Dates: 06 October 1903

Letter to James Cossar Ewart from Sir William Ridgeway, 28 January 1903

 Item
Identifier: Coll-14/9/9/9
Scope and Contents Ridgeway states that he would very much appreciate a cliche of 'Matopo' (a zebra stallion). He adds that he has some blocks of the Kilimanjaro and Somali zebra that would be of interest to Ewart in his research on the zebra. He thinks that his knowledge of the Achaen horse would be of interest to Ewart, as he believes them to be the same as both the small horses of Northern Britain in the time of Caesar, and those of the Danube area. He discusses the spread of the horse into Africa. He agrees...
Dates: 28 January 1903

Letter to James Cossar Ewart from Sir William Ridgeway, 14 March 1903

 Item
Identifier: Coll-14/9/9/32
Scope and Contents Ridgeway refers to the existence of the small zebras in upper Africa and mentions that Africa has been much neglected in scientific and anthropological studies. He also states that he has evidence that the Equus hemionus was in Paphlagonia in Homeric days. He invites Ewart to visit him in Cambridge.
Dates: 14 March 1903

Letter to James Cossar Ewart from Sir William Ridgeway (incomplete), 03 December [1904]

 Item
Identifier: Coll-14/9/10/121
Scope and Contents Ridgeway provides some details about historical accounts of the first horses brought into Mexico and Texas by the Spaniards, in preparation for Ewart's visit to Mexico. He also passes on information from a local farmer, John Thornton, about bronchos in Mexico, and Hans Gadow about dun and roan horses. He congratulates Ewart on his forthcoming marriage.

The latter part of the letter is not present. The letter also bears the incorrect date of 1905.
Dates: 03 December [1904]

Letter to James Cossar Ewart from William Ridgeway, 06 March 1904

 Item
Identifier: Coll-14/9/10/27
Scope and Contents Ridgeway offers his opinions on Ewart's 'excellent paper'. He states that he is sceptical as to the accuracy of cave drawings of horses, but is glad that Ewart expresses doubts as to the domestication of the horse. He recommends that Ewart provide explicitly the evidence of orseus remains from La Monthe, and is unsure about the claim that there are two different stocks in Arabian horses. He enquires as to the relative sizes of the ergots (growths) in Ewart's Mongolian pony and Przewalski's...
Dates: 06 March 1904