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Tales

 Subject
Subject Source: Sss
Scope Note: Created For = CW

Found in 1040 Collections and/or Records:

Various tales, verse and notes., c.1906

 Series
Identifier: Coll-97/CW381
Scope and Contents Series of tales, verse and notes written by Alexander Carmichael. The papers include, a tale headed 'An Righ' written 31 August 1906, a tale about Niall Glundubh MacNeill of Barra, notes on Ciosmal Castle, Barra, notes on the death on Donald Gillies in 1823 in St Kilda and a poem entitled 'Oran a Mart' . Also includes notes on agricultural tenure, tales and poetry by Dugald MacInnes and a lecture by Alexander Carmichael on 'literature and customes of the Scottish Gaels'. The...

Verse 'Duntain chan Barra Glas' and accompanying note, October 1892

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW126f/48
Scope and Contents Verse beginning 'Duntain chan Barra Glas Barr-an-Eas, Am Scuil and all the rest' [Duntanachan, Barra Glas, An Sgurr, Earra Ghàidheal/Argyllshire] and accompanying note which states that a lady in a town beseiged in the Peninsular War was reported to have said this [when] she put her head over a window.

Vocabulary note and accompanying story fragment about 'Righinn donn na sithich[e]an', 1894

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW122/130
Scope and Contents Vocabulary note which reads 'Cnoc na droch comhairle, Caoineachas = Bean Nighe' and accompanying story fragment about 'Nighinn donn na sithich[e]an' that she was sad about the daughters of the kingdom. The text has been scored through in ink as if transcribed elsewhere.

Vocabulary note and story about the name Craideag, 18 May 1895

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/102
Scope and Contents Vocabulary note and story written down by John Ewen MacRury, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula about the name Craidsag, stating that it is a name for a bad joiner or 'timber-spoiler' from the word cnag meaning a short cutting of timber. He adds that 'A man in North Uist [Uibhist a Tuath] is known as Craidsag and a joiner of the most primitive style.'

Vocabulary note and story about the name Cruaicean, 18 May 1895

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/101
Scope and Contents Vocabulary note and story written down by John Ewen MacRury, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula about the name Cruaicean. He states that it is 'applied to a short thick stout man of considerable strength. Cruaic a short stump of a tree or a course (sic) piece of timber'. A man from Rona, North Uist [Rònaigh/Ronay, Uibhist a Tuath/North Uist] who was known as Cruaicean emigrated to America with his family about sixty years before [c1835] where they are known as 'Clann Chruaicean'.

Vocabulary note and story about the name Dustaidh, 18 May 1895

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/104
Scope and Contents Vocabulary note and story written down by John Ewen MacRury, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula about the name Dustaidh, stating that it is the modern term for a bad kelper. 'A man that did not burn the sea weed well and in the usual manner, was known to have a great deal of duast dust, which would require to be reburnt with some well seasoned seaweed very carefully.' A man in Uibhist a Tuath/North Uist became known as dustaidh following a season kelp-making on Rona [Rònaigh/Ronay] 'the ground officer...

Vocabulary note and story about the name Fideadh, 18 May 1895

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/103
Scope and Contents Vocabulary note and story written down by John Ewen MacRury, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula about the name Fideadh that is it used for a 'bad cooper'. MacRury says he remembers a Benbecula man who was given the name Fideadh for that very reason and adds that some say that the surname Fiddes comes from Fideadh. He also states 'In olden times country cooper[s] were numerous but a good tradesman was known as Cuipear - Cooper.'

Vocabulary note entitled 'Clach Nathrach' and accompanying stories, 1895

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/81
Scope and Contents Vocabulary note written down by John Ewen MacRury, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula entitled 'Clach Nathrach' describing it as an 'accumulation of liquid matter form the mouth of the serpent' and where and how it is formed. He recalls having seeing a clach nathrach when at school in Uig, Lewis which was found by 'the herd boy of Croulista...on the south side of Suanaval hill' [Suaineabhal, Eilean Leòdhais/Isle of Lewis]. MacRury notes the clach nathrach as being valued for its healing properties and...

Vocabulary note entitled 'Sea weed', 14 February 1895

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/88
Scope and Contents Vocabulary note written down by John Ewen MacRury, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula entitled 'Sea weed', listing twenty one types of seaweed; describing their physical characteristics such as 'Craigean a small plant like the wide spread palm of a baby'; in many cases noting the proportions of potash and carbonate of lime; uses for the sea weed and in one instance a story to 'throw some light on its [seaweed's] use in the Outer Hebrid[e]s in this century'. The seaweeds described are 'Feamuinn-Dearg,...

Vocabulary note for the place 'Dun Pharlain' and accompanying note about the person 'Banquo', August 1903

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW178/23
Scope and Contents Vocabulary note for the place 'Dun Pharlain = Dumfarlane' [Dùn Phàrlain/Dunfermline, Fìobh/Fife] and accompanying note about the person 'Banquo' that he 'Sent all who spoke the Saxon and if they acquired English he sent them away.' Text has been scored through as if transcribed elsewhere.