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Celtic studies

 Subject
Subject Source: Library of Congress Subject Headings
Scope Note: Created For = CW

Found in 33 Collections and/or Records:

Papers concerning Angus Matheson, 1938

 Series
Identifier: Coll-97/CW401
Scope and Contents Series of papers concerning Angus Matheson of 66 Marchmont Road, Edinburgh. Papers include correspondence dated 31 August 1938, giving an account of Angus Matheson's canvassing for the position of Lecturer in Celtic at Glasgow University. Also one item of correspondence addressed to Dr MacLeod, dated 14 Feb 1938, which comments on George Calder's editing of the Poems of William Ross (Edinburgh, 1937) . Also a letter of application and testimonials in favour of Angus...
Dates: 1938

Printer's copy of Mackinnon's catalogue, early 20th century

 Item
Identifier: Coll-98/5/6
Scope and Contents A bundle of handwritten notes, presumably by Mackinnon, about the contents of his collection. These notes were used in preparation for the printed catalogue.
Dates: early 20th century

Printer's copy of the English translation of the 'Glenmasan Manuscript', Late 19th or early 20th century

 Item
Identifier: Coll-98/3/1/20
Scope and Contents Titled 'Englsh translation', this is the printer's copy of a translation of the Glenmasan Manuscript.
Dates: Late 19th or early 20th century

'Reading book for the use of students of the Gaelic class in the University of Edinburgh'. Printed book, 1889

 Item
Identifier: Coll-98/4/5/8
Scope and Contents This appears to have been a textbook for undergraduates studying Gaelic in the 19th century. It appears to be reading material, mainly prose. The book is interspersed with handwritten notes and translations of words.
Dates: 1889

The Carmichael-Watson Collection

 Fonds
Identifier: Coll-97
Scope and Contents The Carmichael-Watson Collection consists of papers belonging to the Reverend Alexander Cameron of Arran, Alexander Carmichael, civil servant and folklorist, Alexander MacBain of Inverness, and Professor William John Watson and his son James Carmichael Watson, along with books and papers belonging to the Reverend Charles Robertson of Jura, the Reverend Angus MacDonald, the Reverend Archibald MacDonald and the Reverend Father Allan McDonald of Eriskay. These include: invocations...
Dates: 18th century - mid 20th century

The Claim of Celtic Studies upon the Lowland Scot, 1913

 Item
Identifier: Coll-98/1/2/14
Scope and Contents A script or notes for a lecture, apparently to be address to graduates in Celtic at the University of Edinburgh, on 4 July 1913. The subject appears to be on the Highland-Lowland divide, and why Lowlanders should care about Celtic.
Dates: 1913

'[The story of] Deirdre', Early 20th century

 Item
Identifier: Coll-98/3/1/8
Scope and Contents A script or draft article about the mythological Irish figure, Deirdre, from the Ulster Cycle.
Dates: Early 20th century

Transcription of 'Glenmasan Manuscript', Late 19th or early 20th century

 Item
Identifier: Coll-98/3/1/21
Scope and Contents Untitled, but with pencil written at the top of the first 'Glenmasan M.S.', this is a transcription of the Glenmasan manuscript. It contains sections of the Ulster Cycle, written in the Scottish Gaelic of the 15th century (early modern Scottish Gaelic).
Dates: Late 19th or early 20th century

Transcription of 'Story of Déirdre and the sons of Uisneach', Late 19th or early 20th century

 Item
Identifier: Coll-98/3/1/18
Scope and Contents This is a transcription, likely by Donald Mackinnon himself, of the story in the item title. The original manuscript is held at the National Library of Scotland, manuscript number NLS.72.2.3,col.17.
Dates: Late 19th or early 20th century

Translation of the 'Glenmasan Manuscript', Late 19th or early 20th century

 Item
Identifier: Coll-98/3/1/19
Scope and Contents Titled 'The Glenmasan Manuscript', this appears to be a translation into English of the introduction to the text of 'The Story of Deirdre and the Sons of Uisneach'. The story is found in the Glenmasan Manuscript in the National Library of Scotland, NLS.72.2.3
Dates: Late 19th or early 20th century