Skip to main content

Hymns

 Subject
Subject Source: Library of Congress Subject Headings
Scope Note: Created For = CW

Found in 27 Collections and/or Records:

Field notebook of Alexander Carmichael, 1901

 Series
Identifier: Coll-97/CW110
Scope and Contents Field notebook belonging to Alexander Carmichael. Inscribed on the inside front cover is 'Alexander Carmichael, 32 Polworth Gardens, Edinburgh, 11/4 1901' [11 April 1901]. The text is written in both pen and pencil and all of it has been scored through, as if to indicate it has been transcribed elsewhere. The notebook contains vocabulary collected from travelling people, stories about St Columba, proverbs, hymns, stories about prophecy, some notes on birds and otters and cures. The majority of...
Dates: 1901

Fragment of a hymn beginning 'The place of peace thats past belief', c1893

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW126g/43
Scope and Contents Fragment of a hymn beginning 'The place of peace thats past belief, The place of peace is thine.'
Dates: c1893

Fragment of a song entitled 'Duan an Domhnaich', 28 October 1872

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW106/96
Scope and Contents Fragment of a song entitled 'Duan an Domhnaich' [Duan an Dòmhnaich or Hymn of the Sunday] probably collected from Archibald Currie, aged forty-six, shoemaker, Àird na Monadh, Uibhist a Deas/South Uist, beginning '[-] Chriosta cholain, Gun eisd ri glearaich nan gall.' The song is composed of three lines and has been scored through in ink.
Dates: 28 October 1872

Gaelic hymns, 18th or 19th century

 Item
Identifier: Coll-98/4/3/13
Scope and Contents These appears to be hymns in Gaelic. They were noted in previous historical records by the first line on the first page Lomnochd mar thainig sinn asteach, which translates as 'We are naked when we come in [to this world]'. Some pages are headed with what appears to be sections of the Bible, e.g. III.Joh.1.21.
Dates: 18th or 19th century

Hymn beginning 'Chruth[aich] Dia an duin an tus' and vocabulary note, 1901

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW110/103
Scope and Contents Hymn probably collected from Ann MacDonald, age 75, Achaderry, Glen Spean, Lochaber [Achadoire, Gleann Spean, Loch Abar, Siorramachd Inbhir Nis/Inverness-shire] beginning 'Chruth[aich] Dia an duin an tus, Gu staid bhean nan gras.' The song is composed of sixteen verses of four lines each.The vocabulary note, written transversely, reads 'shiollag = Glitter (bhiollag?)' and has been scored through as if transcribed elsewhere. Beside verses four and five is written 'Modern'.
Dates: 1901

Hymn beginning 'Fhir a chruthaich fhir a chriu' and accompanying note, 1883

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW87/18
Scope and Contents Hymn beginning 'Fhir a chruthaich fhir a chriu' collected from Captain Alexander Matheson, shipmaster, Doirni, Ceanntaile [An Dòrnaidh/Dornie, Cinn Tàile/Kintail, Ros is Cromba/Ross and Cromarty] but written at Creagorry [Creag Ghoraidh, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula] on 11 August 1875. The text has been altered in both pen and pencil including a pencil tick against every verse. The note states that the hymn is 'obscure and evidently imperfect' and that Captain Matheson heard it from an old woman...
Dates: 1883

Hymn beginning 'Is gearr gus am bi chol sin' and vocabulary notes, 1901

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW110/104
Scope and Contents Hymn probably collected from Ann MacDonald, age 75, Achaderry, Glen Spean, Lochaber [Achadoire, Gleann Spean, Loch Abar, Siorramachd Inbhir Nis/Inverness-shire] beginning 'Is gearr gus am bi chol sin, Air lothadh is air fail'. The song is composed of thirty lines mostly arranged in four line stanzas. Vocabulary notes indicate the word for 'limpid' and the word for 'shiny/shimmery'. The text has been scored through in pencil and in ink as if transcribed elsewhere.
Dates: 1901

Hymn for the dying, 1901

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW110/12
Scope and Contents Hymn for the dying collected from Peggie MacNeill, Gleann/Glen, Barraigh/Isle of Barra beginning 'M anamsa an a laimhs a Righ, A Righ na carach neo. The song is composed of nineteen lines. Peggie states that she heard the prayer from her father John MacNeill and she has taught them to her own children noting 'Both [her parents] had many many old hymns now lost and never heard - not even the name of them.' Text has been scored through as if transcribed elsewhere.
Dates: 1901

Lecture notes: 'Modern Gaelic hymns', 1890s

 Item
Identifier: Coll-98/1/1/16
Scope and Contents This notebook contains a script for a lecture, which was probably delivered on multiple occasions (the front of the notebook notes 15 December 1890 and 22 January 1894, for example). The lecture introduces students to the history, themes, and structures of hymns in Gaelic.
Dates: 1890s

Letter to Sir Donald Francis Tovey from Sir Frederick Pollock, 15 August 1934

 Item
Identifier: Coll-411/1/1/L1497
Scope and Contents Letter, 15 August 1934, Surrey, Frederick Pollock to Donald Tovey. Suggesting that the Latin hymns are too dogmatic and that the Vulgata, Psalms, Apocrypha, Job and St. Paul offer a wealth of material for hymns. Holograph signed.
Dates: 15 August 1934