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Loss (of people or things)

 Subject
Subject Source: Library of Congress Subject Headings
Scope Note: Created For = CW

Found in 40 Collections and/or Records:

Place-name notes and story about Uamh na h-aonaig and Uamh-Ghàrsa, 1867

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW114/43
Scope and Contents Place-name notes and story probably collected from Roderick MacNeil, aged 88, crofter, Miùghlaigh/Mingulay about Uamh na h-aonaig and Uamh-Ghàrsa [Uamh na h-Aoneig and possibly Uamh Guarsaigh]. Uamh na h-Aonaig is 'said to come down half way to the bay', while Uamh Gharsa [on] Sanndray [Sanndraigh/Sandray] is said to go in on the west end of the strand and come out opposite Pabay [Pabaigh]. The story tells how a dog once went in one end and came out of the other 'devoid of hair. The foul air...
Dates: 1867

Poem or song beginning 'Tha uaisle air MacLeoid', 27 February 1895

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/91
Scope and Contents Poem or song written down by John Ewen MacRury, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula, beginning 'Tha uaisle air MacLeoid, 'S cha' n e uaisle Innsa-Gall'. The poem/song is composed of eight lines and is written in ink.
Dates: 27 February 1895

Song about Uamh-an-Oir, accompanying story and notes, 1867

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW114/42
Scope and Contents Song about Uamh-an-Oir probably collected from Roderick MacNeil, aged 88, crofter, Miùghlaigh/Mingulay beginning 'Na minn bheaga na minn bheaga/theaga, Dol eir creagan dol sna creag' composed of thirteen lines. Uamh-an-Oir is described as starting at Cliata cliff and going under Barra to Gearragaal east of Orasay [Uamh an Òir, Cliaid, Orasaigh, Barraigh/Isle of Barra]. The story tells how five men went into the cave with dogs but only the dogs returned and they were hairless. 'The smith of Loch...
Dates: 1867

Song beginning 'A Mhor a bhinneag bheil u noc airson na coine' and accompanying note, October 1872

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW106/114
Scope and Contents Song beginning 'A Mhor a bhinneag bheil [th]u noc[hd] airson na coine' and accompanying note which tells how two lovers were to meet but she never showed up and he thought she had died so he went wandering and one day turned up at her house singing the song. Text has been scored through as if transcribed elsewhere.
Dates: October 1872

Song beginning 'A Mhor a Mhor a Mhor', 30 October 1872

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW106/117
Scope and Contents Song probably collected from Angus Currie, Àird na Monadh, Uibhist a Deas/South Uist beginning 'A Mhor a Mhor a Mhor, Dh-eir mi mall s dh eir mi moch'.
Dates: 30 October 1872

Song beginning 'A Mhor Mhor till no', 22 August 1903

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW178/6
Scope and Contents Song probably collected from Mary MacRae, Dùnan, Letterfearn, Ros is Cromba/Ross and Cromarty, beginning 'A Mhor Mhor till no, is fuar am bad an t ait[e]'. The song consists of seven lines and a note which reads 'Bacan a few trout' in reference to the final line of the song 'Gheo thu am bacan bhreac bho'n lochan'. Text has been scored through as if transcribed elsewhere.
Dates: 22 August 1903

Song beginning 'Ailein Duinn shiulain leat' and accompanying story, 7 August 1870

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW116/5
Scope and Contents Song collected from 'Ceit wife [of] Don[ald] MacKin[n]on nee Urqhuart', Tarasaigh/Taransay beginning 'Ailein Dhuinn shiulainn leat, M iar[rtas] eir Ri[gh nan] aingeaol'. The song was composed by Ana ni Dhonil ic Iain oig Chaimbeul [Anna Campbell] who was engaged to Allan Morrison of Crossobost, Lews [Crosbost, Eilean Leòdhais/Isle of Lewis], who drowned. She was said to have died soon after of a broken heart and was to be buried at Rodail [Rodel] and ended up being buried at sea, near to her...
Dates: 7 August 1870

Song beginning 'B[h]on thainig mi dhan duthaich so gur beag mo shunt ri ceol' and accompanying story, 1860

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW109/10
Scope and Contents Song probably collected in An t-Eilean Sgitheanach/Isle of Skye beginning 'B[h]on thainig mi dhan duthaich so gur beag mo shunt ri ceol' ['Thug mi gaol do'n t-seòladair']. Carmichael writes that the song was composed the previous summer (1859) by Anna MacLeod to a handsome young sailor called Donald Peaton [Beaton or Paton]. While Anna was singing the song, Donald's mother came into the house and fell into a swoon because Donald had been drowned. On reviving, she asked Anna to sing the song...
Dates: 1860

Song beginning 'Ceud sorie Mhaoldonaich', 14 July 1870 and 11 December 1873

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW116/94
Scope and Contents Song beginning 'Ceud sorie Mhaoldonaich, Cha be 'n Donach b' fhear[r] gleat ort' probably collected from Margaret MacDonald, Malacleit/Malaclete, Uibhist a Tuath/North Uist. The song is composed of eighteen lines and has been scored through in ink with the following written transversely over it 'Transcribed 11/12 83 Book III page 236 A[lexander] C[armichael].'
Dates: 14 July 1870 and 11 December 1873

Song beginning 'Chi mi ghrian a fala gu siulach', 22 May 1869 and 16 June 1869

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW150/24
Scope and Contents Song collected on Miùghlaigh/Mingulay beginning 'Chi mi ghrian a fala gu siulach, Si dol tiom Ru'n dunu'. The song is composed of thirty-seven lines, with the final two lines being scored out as if deleted. There are two places marked with the numbers '1' and '2' as if the second pair are to be inserted where the first pair are written. The text has been scored through in ink and written transversely across it is written 'Trans[cribed] June 16 1869 A[lexander] A[rchibald] C[armichael].'
Dates: 22 May 1869 and 16 June 1869