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Political cartoons

 Subject
Subject Source: Library of Congress Subject Headings
Scope Note: Created For = TD

Found in 7 Collections and/or Records:

Autochrome Punch Almanack Cover, 1870s-1930s

 Item
Identifier: Coll-1434/3189
Scope and Contents Autochrome cover of Punch Almanack showing a man holding a British Union Jack flag standing on a horse as it jumps over a German 'monster' with a white bull dog barking at its side from the early 20th century during World War I.
Dates: 1870s-1930s

"Comfortig the Enemy" and "Hoch der Wilhsohn", 1870s-1930s

 Item
Identifier: Coll-1434/3193
Scope and Contents Political cartoons from World War I commenting on how the Germans take pleasure in a distracted Britain with US President Wilson with his head in the clouds and British Prime Minister Lloyd George asking not to hurt the Germans.
Dates: 1870s-1930s

How We Gamble Without Knowing It, 1870s-1930s

 Item
Identifier: Coll-1434/3258
Scope and Contents Cartoon by WK Haselden on 'How we gamble without knowing it' which is a comment on the House of Commons decision on Premium Bonds in the early 20th century.
Dates: 1870s-1930s

Punch Cartoons. [World War I Poem], 1870s-1930s

 Item
Identifier: Coll-1434/3196
Scope and Contents Political cartoon illustrated by Bernard Partridge of a story poem allegory of the German Kaiser going to tame a cock, lion and bear and failing in World War I.
Dates: 1870s-1930s

Remarkable Case of Protective Colouring, 1870s-1930s

 Item
Identifier: Coll-1434/3209
Scope and Contents Cartoon illustration of a zookeeper surprised at the stars and stripes colouring of a zebra in its pen during World War I. The text beneath the image reads: 'Remarkable case of protective colouring. Owing, it is believed, to the fears of a German invasion, a zebra at the zoo assumes a neutral aspect.'
Dates: 1870s-1930s

The Boche Versus the Thistles, 1870s-1930s

 Item
Identifier: Coll-1434/3179
Scope and Contents Political cartoon showing German World War I soldiers being attacked by smiling thistles and forced to retreat.
Dates: 1870s-1930s

Wound Up, But Why Not Spinning?, 1870s-1930s

 Item
Identifier: Coll-1434/3166
Scope and Contents Cartoon illustration entitled, "Wound Up, But Why Not Spinning?" commenting on the red tape on trade with enemy firms from the Financial Mail, November 11, 1910.
Dates: 1870s-1930s