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Huygens, Christiaan, 1629-1695 (Dutch mathematician)

 Person

Found in 17 Collections and/or Records:

A paper of my own about the descent in a Cycloid printed in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society in 1697, cFebruary 1697

 Item
Identifier: Coll-33/Quarto A [22]
Scope and Contents A late draft of an elementary development of Christiaan Huygens' work on the cycloid, that finally appeared anonymously in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society for February 1697 (nos 225, 424).

Apud Doctorem Ruyschium Amsterodami, 24 May 1693

 Item
Identifier: Coll-33/Quarto A [10]
Scope and Contents Notes from a paediatric anatomy demonstration, that appears to have dealt with certain birth defects. Followed by what appears to be a note about an actuarial problem concerning human senescence; several individuals who have worked on it are named, including Christiaan Huygens. Then follows a diagram of a machine designed by Jan Hudde for descrying a curve of changing slope. Last is a note about a conversation with Hudde about calculating dimensions and focal length of lenses in apertures.

De affirmanda parallaxi magni orbis, cogitatum Hugenii, June 1693

 Item
Identifier: Coll-33/Quarto A [15]
Scope and Contents A transcription of Christiaan Huygen's argument that because stars' observed radii are so insensibly small, the diameter of the earth's orbit relative to the stars' position is also insensible, and thus the parallax measurement, which ought to prove or disprove the Copernican layout of the heavens, is useless.

Epist ad D. Hugenium..., 10 September 1693

 Item
Identifier: Coll-33/Folio C [180]
Scope and Contents Draft of a letter to Christiaan Huygens, in which Gregory follows up on his promise in Holland to send along his 'second method' of quadrature in detail.

Folio C, c1680-c1708

 Series — Volume: Dc.1.61
Identifier: Coll-33/Folio C
Scope and Contents The papers of David Gregory consist of: These are mostly handwritten items, bound together as a volume, though with some loose insertions of manuscripts which had strayed, some of them with modern annotations concerning their provenance. Their scope and content is as David Gregory indexed them, save for the missing items, which consist of two dozen papers and letters on general physics and maths, and several...

Index Chartarum in M.S. C. in folio, 1700

 Item
Identifier: Coll-33/Folio C [index]
Scope and Contents An index, in Gregory's hand, to the material he designated as Folio C.

Machinae, Hydrostaticae, et hydraulicae et Barascopium Hugen:, December 1680

 Item
Identifier: Coll-33/Folio C [157]
Scope and Contents Novelties seen and sketched by Gregory in Paris. The hydraulic machine caused a doll to fly inside a bottle.

Memoranda et observata in Batavia 1693 Maio, 17 May 1693

 Item
Identifier: Coll-33/Quarto A [31]
Scope and Contents Batavia is a seventeenth-century cognomen for the Netherlands, to which David Gregory went in the spring of 1693, mostly to talk science with Christiaan Huygens. This document is a list of some books he wished to buy for himself and for friends back home, if he could find them. They covered Palladius, Thucydides, Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Erasmus, "all I can find of the Roman Authors at Amst[erdam]", and others. On the reverse is a list of topics he wished to discuss when he finally sat down...

Observata et Dicta ... cum Huygeno Junio 1693, 30 June 1693

 Item
Identifier: Coll-33/Quarto A [14]
Scope and Contents Remarks en passant about library volumes in history and physics seen in Leiden. A longer passage follows: notes to a conversation with Christiaan Huygens, critiquing Sir Isaac Newton's notions of absolute motion and the propagation of light. Huygens also says that John Flamsteed ought to declare for the absolute speed of light, and that this should persuade Jean Dominique Cassini.

Observata et dicta apud D. Hugenium, 06 June 1693

 Item
Identifier: Coll-33/Quarto A [4]
Scope and Contents Notes of a conversation in Holland with Christian Huygens, concerning an 'horologium' to show hours, months, years, and planetary positions. More general mention of the work of numerous other scientists: Notably, Huygens disputes the notion of John Bernoulli (James Bernoulli's younger brother) that the curve of an inflated sail is part-catenary and part-circle, and warns that Newton ought not to be 'deflected' into theology or chemistry.