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Names

 Subject
Subject Source: Sss
Scope Note: Created For = CW

Found in 39 Collections and/or Records:

Story about [Diarmaid] and accompanying verse., c1866

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW104/14
Scope and Contents Story probably collected from Donald MacPhee, Ìochdar, Uibhist a Deas/South Uist, about [Diarmaid] and accompanying verse beginning 'Cha do shaoil le m'athair fhein, Gur eir feola bha nam chrì'. The story tells how a king ordered all old people to be put to death and then for every man to bring his enemies, children, animals, musicians and fools to him. One poor man dug a hole in the ground and put his father in it. His father told him to follow the king's orders and so they arrived at the...

Story about Siol Ghorrie [Sìol Ghoraidh] and Siol Mhur[achaidh], 14 July 1870

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW116/99
Scope and Contents Story about Siol Ghorrie [Sìol Ghoraidh] probably collected from Margaret MacDonald, Malacleit/Malaclete, Uibhist a Tuath/North Uist. The story tells how Goraidh was descended from MacDonald of Duntuilm [Dùn Thuilm/Duntulm, An t-Eilean Sgitheanach/Isle of Skye] and Murdoch [Murchadh] from MacDonald of Cinntire [Cinn Tìre/Kintyre]. Mac Suain mor a Raarsai [MacSween of Raasay] killed Goraidh in an attempt to have Trotternish [Tròndairnis] for himself but he failed to get this. There were eighteen...

Story about Sìne nighean MhicLeòid, 20 January 1871

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW116/142
Scope and Contents Story collected from Eachann Macleoid [Hector MacLeod], aged 85, at Caisteal Bhuiri, Lianacleit [Caisteal Bhuirgh/Borve Castle, Lionacleit/Linaclate, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula]. His patronymic is given as 'Each[ann] mac Dhonul ic 'Urchai ic Neil ic Coinnich ic Iain ic Ruari ic Thormaid ic Uilleam ic Thorcail ic Leoid Leothais'. Hector states that he is the same age as Clanranald and that his great grandfather Niall mac Leoid [Neil MacLeod] came with Sine ni[gh]ean mhic Leoid Leodhais [Eilean...

Story about the Campbells, blacksmiths at Bonawe, 6 July 1892

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW126f/13
Scope and Contents Story probably collected from Duncan MacNiven, retired schoolmaster, Airds, Earra Ghàidheal/Argyllshire about the Campbells, blacksmiths at Bonawe [Bun Obha], that the original Campbell came there from Kilmartin [Cille Mhàrtainn], where he had been an apprentice because his master had been jealous of his 'tempering - adhart - binding a sword to hilt'. Text has been scored through as if transcribed elsewhere.

Story title and fragment of an informant's name which reads 'Cailleach Luirsag, From Donald Mac[-]', October 1870

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW116/128
Scope and Contents Story title and fragment of an informant's name which reads 'Cailleach Luirsag, From Donald Mac[-]'.

Vocabulary note and story about the name Craideag, 18 May 1895

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/102
Scope and Contents Vocabulary note and story written down by John Ewen MacRury, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula about the name Craidsag, stating that it is a name for a bad joiner or 'timber-spoiler' from the word cnag meaning a short cutting of timber. He adds that 'A man in North Uist [Uibhist a Tuath] is known as Craidsag and a joiner of the most primitive style.'

Vocabulary note and story about the name Cruaicean, 18 May 1895

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/101
Scope and Contents Vocabulary note and story written down by John Ewen MacRury, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula about the name Cruaicean. He states that it is 'applied to a short thick stout man of considerable strength. Cruaic a short stump of a tree or a course (sic) piece of timber'. A man from Rona, North Uist [Rònaigh/Ronay, Uibhist a Tuath/North Uist] who was known as Cruaicean emigrated to America with his family about sixty years before [c1835] where they are known as 'Clann Chruaicean'.

Vocabulary note and story about the name Dustaidh, 18 May 1895

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/104
Scope and Contents Vocabulary note and story written down by John Ewen MacRury, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula about the name Dustaidh, stating that it is the modern term for a bad kelper. 'A man that did not burn the sea weed well and in the usual manner, was known to have a great deal of duast dust, which would require to be reburnt with some well seasoned seaweed very carefully.' A man in Uibhist a Tuath/North Uist became known as dustaidh following a season kelp-making on Rona [Rònaigh/Ronay] 'the ground officer...

Vocabulary note and story about the name Fideadh, 18 May 1895

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/103
Scope and Contents Vocabulary note and story written down by John Ewen MacRury, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula about the name Fideadh that is it used for a 'bad cooper'. MacRury says he remembers a Benbecula man who was given the name Fideadh for that very reason and adds that some say that the surname Fiddes comes from Fideadh. He also states 'In olden times country cooper[s] were numerous but a good tradesman was known as Cuipear - Cooper.'