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Sayings

 Subject
Subject Source: Sss
Scope Note: Created For = CW

Found in 132 Collections and/or Records:

Vocabulary for the phrase 'Na feachaid orm', 1894

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW122/168
Scope and Contents Vocabulary for the phrase 'Na feachaid orm' which means 'Do not spot me'.

Vocabulary for wild garlic and quote, August 1883

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW120/107
Scope and Contents Vocabulary for 'wild garlic' being 'creamh nam fiadh' and quote which reads 'An [lin] aig an t seana-bhean san t iasg meamh aig a chloinn'.

Vocabulary list for fish and shellfish and some related sayings, June 1887

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW89/178
Scope and Contents Vocabulary list for fish and shellfish, including several descriptions of fish such as 'Falmair = Large teeth col[our] of Salm[on] as long + lith[e as an] eel - coarse fish'; 'Cilig = Cod'; 'Sachasan = sand eel' and some related sayings including 'S boc[hd] an clad[ach] air nach fhaig[hear] maor[aich]'.

Vocabulary note about the word 'Bralosgadh' and accompanying poem, 1895

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/100
Scope and Contents Vocabulary note written down by John Ewen MacRury, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula about the word 'Bralosgadh' describing it as 'a great heap of every sort of fuel or combustibles collected on an eminence on marriage occasions or on the coming of age of Chiefs'. He states that 'bonfire' is the closest word to it he knows and as an example of its use gives a saying and a poem, which begins 'Nuair a chaidh iad do'n ghleann, 'sa leag iad damh sheang'.

Vocabulary note about 'Ullag', c1893

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW126g/25
Scope and Contents Vocabulary note about 'Ullag' that it is 'A stone put in red hot to dry corn'. The note includes the phrase 'Ha! ha! tiondaigh claich fo d shiol!' and also that 'Biorsamaid = steel yard'.

Vocabulary note entitled 'Al & Fual', 1895

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/77
Scope and Contents Vocabulary note written down by John Ewen MacRury, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula entitled 'Al & Fual' including 'Al is generally one of the old Celtic names for water' citing examples such as 'Algeal an old decease common to young people if weak spine which generally follows after too much running in hot weather.' Text has been scored through in pencil as if transcribed elsewhere.

Vocabulary note entitled 'Heigir or Eigir', 1895

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/76
Scope and Contents Vocabulary note written down by John Ewen MacRury, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula entitled 'Heigir or Eigir' describing the term as being commonly used amongst old highlanders and 'often used as a nick-name ofr hald grown boys, having a pale looking face long thin bones and bent inwards casan cuiladh or cuile.' He describes how it is pronounced in different parts of Gaelic-speaking Scotland with examples of expressions. Text has been scored through in pencil as if transcribed elsewhere.

Vocabulary note for Aithealag, c1876

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW150/88
Scope and Contents Vocabulary note probably collected in Uibhist/Uist which reads 'Aithealag = oibhleag = small peat fire'. The text has been scored through in ink as if transcribed elsewhere.

Vocabulary note for 'Ruth' and 'Rath' and accompanying proverb, 1894

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW122/172
Scope and Contents Vocabulary note for 'Ruth' and 'Rath' 'Greaning, procreation' and 'Prosperity progeny' respectively and accompanying proverb which reads 'Mas fear ealainn thu, Cluinnimid feobhas do laimh.'

Vocabulary note for the bird 'Sturrag' [Hoodie crow] and accompanying phrase, c1893

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW126g/10
Scope and Contents Vocabulary note for the bird 'Sturrag' or 'Starrag' which means 'Hoodie [crow]' and accompanying phrase which reads 'An Sturrag a gurrail 'sa choill'.