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Children

 Subject
Subject Source: Library of Congress Subject Headings
Scope Note: Created For = NAHSTE

Found in 66 Collections and/or Records:

Story entitled 'An Leanadh Ileach', c1875

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW105/27
Scope and Contents Story entitled 'An Leanadh Ileach' [An Leanabh Ìleach] about a precocious child or changeling who became 'An t-ollamh Ileach' that is a doctor probably from the Beaton family.
Dates: c1875

Story entitled 'An Tuanach agus a sheachnar Ghillean', 1860 to 1861

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW109/2
Scope and Contents Story entitled 'An Tuanach agus a sheachnar Ghillean' [similar to folktales of 'The Extraordinary Companion'] collected from Ruaridh Camshron [Roderick Cameron], Carbost [Càrabost, An t-Eilean Sgitheanach/Isle of Skye] on 14 November 1860. The story tells of how a farmer went out hunting and on growing weary lay down to sleep. On waking up he found the heather growing all around him and his dogs dead. When he arrived home, his son who was a baby when he left had grown up and all his servants...
Dates: 1860 to 1861

Story entitled 'Mac Dhearg', 29 January 1875

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW106/121
Scope and Contents Story entitled 'Mac Dhearg' [Muc Dhearg] collected from Iain Macinnes [John MacInnes], aged 70 years, Staoligeary [Stadhlaigearraidh/Stilligarry, Uibhist a Deas/South Uist]. The story tells of a woman in Howgearry [Hogha Gearraidh/Hougharry, Uibhist a Tuath/North Uist] whose child is replaced by a changeling and all he will say is ''muc dhearg muc dhearg'. MacIlleMhoire sends the woman and child to MacMhuirich Mòr in Stilligarry who manages to change the child back by repeating 'Muc dhearg'...
Dates: 29 January 1875

Story entitled 'Sitheach an sliochd Leanabh Beag' about a fairy child, 1891

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW108/137
Scope and Contents Story entitled 'Sitheach an sliochd Leanabh Beag' about two women whose children had been swapped with fairy children. The first would not stop eating or drinking or crying, so on the advice of an old woman she threw the child in the river. The instant she did that her own child came back. The second woman's fairy child would not stop crying and was not growing. She told the child she was tired of him and he replied that if she kept it a secret he would give her a rest and do some dancing for...
Dates: 1891

The Myles Children, 1870s-1930s

 Item
Identifier: Coll-1434/2017
Scope and Contents Photograph of the two Myles children riding donkeys in Argentina in the early 20th century.
Dates: 1870s-1930s

Thirteen-Year-Old Girl as "Trainer", 1870s-1930s

 Item
Identifier: Coll-1434/1999
Scope and Contents Photographs of Naomi Shankland, the thirteen year-old daughter of John Shankland of Effingham, Surrey taking care of racehorses on her father's farm in the early 20th century.
Dates: 1870s-1930s

Three sayings or proverbs, 1895

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/97
Scope and Contents Three sayings or proverbs beginning 'Is furasda dh'fhear eisdeachd Beum fhaighinn/thoir a dh-fhear labhairt'; 'Co seolta ri sionnach na Maoile' and 'Mionnan bi-bhuan da a mac'.
Dates: 1895

[Two Children with a Goat Cart], 1870s-1930s

 Item
Identifier: Coll-1434/3450
Scope and Contents Photograph of a little boy sitting on a small cart holding the reins of a goat that has been harnessed to it with a little girl standing next to the goat in a yard in the early 20th century.
Dates: 1870s-1930s

Vocabulary note entitled 'Al & Fual', 1895

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/77
Scope and Contents Vocabulary note written down by John Ewen MacRury, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula entitled 'Al & Fual' including 'Al is generally one of the old Celtic names for water' citing examples such as 'Algeal an old decease common to young people if weak spine which generally follows after too much running in hot weather.' Text has been scored through in pencil as if transcribed elsewhere.
Dates: 1895

Vocabulary note entitled 'Heigir or Eigir', 1895

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/76
Scope and Contents Vocabulary note written down by John Ewen MacRury, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula entitled 'Heigir or Eigir' describing the term as being commonly used amongst old highlanders and 'often used as a nick-name ofr hald grown boys, having a pale looking face long thin bones and bent inwards casan cuiladh or cuile.' He describes how it is pronounced in different parts of Gaelic-speaking Scotland with examples of expressions. Text has been scored through in pencil as if transcribed elsewhere.
Dates: 1895