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Seasons

 Subject
Subject Source: Library of Congress Subject Headings
Scope Note: Created For = CW

Found in 25 Collections and/or Records:

Custom about 'Frìth', 3 January 1872

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW90/13
Scope and Contents Custom about 'Frìth' probably collected in Gramasdail/Gramsdale, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula, in which the 'Frith rinn Moire ga Mac' [augury] is repeated as the person goes out to the door step mentioning the home of the person concerned. It is made on the first Monday of the quarter between sunset and sunrise.

Fragment of a proverb beginning 'Bleadhan t sneachda bhuidhe', 22 August 1903

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW178/3
Scope and Contents Fragment of a proverb probably collected from Mary MacRae, Dùnan, Letterfearn, Ros is Cromba/Ross and Cromarty, which reads 'Bleadhan t sneachda bhuidhe? Earrach Duibh a Challa? The snows of gr[e]at'. Text has been scored through as if transcribed elsewhere.

Fragment of a story for the song entitled 'Laoidh Earragain Mhoir', c1875

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW112/81
Scope and Contents Fragment of a story for the song entitled 'Laoidh Earragain Mhoir' collected from Eachun MacIosaig [Hector MacIsaac] Ceannlangabhad, Iocar, Uist Deas [Ceannlangabhat, Ìochdar, Uibhist a Deas/South Uist] on 6 October 1865. The story tells how when Fionn and the Fenians went hunting in Ireland every year, Righ Èirinn [King of Ireland] would give them men to look after them. In the winter, back in Scotland, the Fenians began their Christmas festivities and someone reported to Fionn that there were...

Fragmentary notes on Tolstadh Bho Thuath, landownership and serpents, 17 October 1873

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW114/82
Scope and Contents Fragmentary notes on Tolstadh Bho Thuath [Eilean Leòdhais/Isle of Lewis], landownership and serpents. The writing is difficult to make out but seems to refer to people leaving Tolstadh Bho Thuath and the land being given to a Sas[senach] [Englishman] and managed by a shepherd. There is also mention of a tradition which believes that serpents go into the ground in autumn and appear again in the spring.

List entitled 'Gnath-Fhocail', c1862

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW112/50
Scope and Contents List entitled 'Gnath-Fhocail' containing proverbs and sayings on subjects such as days, weather, seasons and living creatures.

Note about the 'De-dieann', 27 October 1873

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW115/27
Scope and Contents Note about the 'De-dieann' which reads 'Winter amuse[ment]s - a little creat[ure] call[led] An De-dieann/ De-dio'eann dileas - They w[ou]ld him dance on the bac easgaid na fri &c. Totachan Clann Andain Falbh sar a cu &c.'

Notes on stars and accompanying verse, 29 October 1872

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW106/109
Scope and Contents Notes on stars including that Mainneag or Maidneag is the morning star, that 'Grioglachan gets its course on S[aint] Michael & loses it on new years night' and that 'An t-Iasgair' is the star of the East at night. There is also a short verse beginning 'Ni Ri Eangain 'sa 3 len'.

Proverb beginning 'An sneac[hd] nach tig mu shamh', 1885

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW120/279
Scope and Contents Proverb beginning 'An sneac[hd] nach tig mu shamh', possibly a fragment of the proverb 'An t-sneachd nach tig mu Shamhuinn thig gu reamhar mu Fheill-Bhrìgde' [The snow that comes not at Hallowmass will come thick at Candlemas]

Proverb beginning 'Cha ro Ciadain riamh gun ghrian', 1894

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW122/134
Scope and Contents Proverb beginning 'Cha ro Ciadain riamh gun ghrian, Cha ro geamhradh ria gun smal'. The text has been scored through in pencil.

Proverb beginning 'Dua[i]r bhios crannalaich do ghaoith an ear', 1901

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW110/68
Scope and Contents Proverb beginning 'Dua[i]r bhios crannalaich do ghaoith an ear'. The text has been scored through.