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Scottish Gaelic literature

 Subject
Subject Source: Library of Congress Subject Headings
Scope Note: Created For = CW

Found in 82 Collections and/or Records:

A draft paper discussing a Gaelic version of Pharsalia, Late 19th or early 20th century

 Item
Identifier: Coll-98/4/6/8
Scope and Contents Marked 'Mackinnon A5' and noted thus in previous historical records. This appears to be a draft paper, written by Mackinnon himself, discussing a Gaelic version of the Latin epic poem, 'Pharsalia'. Mackinnon refers to a few scholars and their role in previous understandings of Pharslia, but these names are difficult to source in the historical record, e.g. Dr Donald Smith.There appears to be no Gaelic whatsoever in this text, and it is not clear to which version of Pharsalia he is...

A draft paper discussing Gaelic versions of classical epics, Late 19th or early 20th century

 Item
Identifier: Coll-98/4/6/9
Scope and Contents Marked 'Mackinnon A6' and noted thus in previous historical records. This appears to be a draft paper, written by Mackinnon himself, discussing Gaelic versions of the classical epic poems. However, the appears to be no Gaelic whatsoever in this notebook.

'Abstract of Course [in Celtic] of Lectures. Part I: Language; Part II: Literature', 1886-1895

 Item
Identifier: Coll-98/1/1/4
Scope and Contents A syllabus for students of Celtic, presumably at the University of Edinburgh.

'An Fheinn air a h-Uilinn', Early 20th century

 Item
Identifier: Coll-98/3/3/3
Scope and Contents Marked 'Mackinnon A17' and noted thus in previous historical records. The title of the booklet, An Fheinn air a h-Uilinn translates to English has 'The Fianna on their elbows', possibly referring to the semi-independent warrior bands in Irish mythology. It is a proverb in Gaelic to describe an action or activity only half complete. This notebook contains prose, possibly an essay, about the proverb. There are a number of annotations, possibly tutor's corrections,...

Celtic Class Notes, 1890-1891

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW23
Scope and Contents 2 volumes of celtic class notes taken by Rev Charles Robertson. It is likely that the lectures in these notebooks were delivered by Donald Mackinnon. Contents include gaelic translations, gaelic phonetics, proverbs and riddles, old gaelic hymns, literature and philology.

Celtic Philology (Notes for a lecture series), 1886-1887

 Item
Identifier: Coll-98/1/1/18
Scope and Contents A bundle of 11 notebooks, containing notes or scripts for lectures on a lecture series, which seems to have taken place between 1886 and 1887. The following notebooks survive:'Origins and position of the Celtic languages in the Indo-European group' (Item B.41a)'Early literature: Adamnan, etc.' (Item B.41b)'Letters and their sounds: Ogham' (Item B.41c)'Vowels and laws of sound change' (Item B.41d)'Grimm's Law' (Item B.41e)'Phonetic processes. Part I' (Item...

'Cha 'n eil ceò an tigh na h-Uiseige', Early 20th century

 Item
Identifier: Coll-98/3/1/5
Scope and Contents Marked 'Mackinnon A15' and noted thus in previous historical records. The title of the booklet, Cha 'n eil ceò an tigh na h-Uiseige translates to English has 'The lark's house has no smoke'. It is a metaphorical title based on a Gaelic saying about how happy people do not have negativity at home. The title describes the content of the booklet: the decline of the bardic patronage in Highland culture by suggesting an alternative interpretation of this saying: that...

'Cha 'n eil ceò an tigh na h-Uiseige', Early 20th century

 Item
Identifier: Coll-98/3/1/6
Scope and Contents Marked 'Mackinnon A16' and noted thus in previous historical records. The title of the booklet, Cha 'n eil ceò an tigh na h-Uiseige translates to English has 'The lark's house has no smoke'. It is a metaphorical title based on a Gaelic saying about how happy people do not have negativity at home. The title describes the content of the booklet: the decline of the bardic patronage in Highland culture by suggesting an alternative interpretation of this saying: that...

'Chi mi sin is fuaighidh mi so', 20th century

 Item
Identifier: Coll-98/3/1/9
Scope and Contents 'Chì mi seo is fuaighidh mi so', which translates to English as, 'I see this and I sew that', is a folk tale from Argyll about a tailor who does not believe in apparitions or supersticions. This may be a script for a lecture or a text for students of Celtic at the University of Edinburgh.

Class lectures and related notes, written by W.J. Watson, 1880s

 Series
Identifier: Coll-97/CW374
Scope and Contents Series of class lectures and class notes, written by William J. Watson. Includes a series of lectures on Scottish Gaelic Literature, a verse entitled 'Praise of Mary' from the Leabhar Breac, lists of place names in Perth, Forfar, Fife, and Dumbarton, a list of Scottish Saints and 4 pages of notes on Tiraphuir, Lismore, by Alexander Carmichael.