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Etymology

 Subject
Subject Source: Library of Congress Subject Headings
Scope Note: Created For = CW

Found in 62 Collections and/or Records:

Story about how Dail na Coise was named, 18 September 1884

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW120/234
Scope and Contents Story about how Dail na Coise was named stating that Macdougal of Lorn had a sore foot which no one could heal so he sent for MacConnachar [MacConacher] the doctor. MacDougall said he would give MacConnachar anything if he healed his foot and MacConnachar asked for the field below the house, which was thereafter called 'Dail na Coise'.

Story about how 'Slioc na Feanaig' got its name, August 1883

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW120/142
Scope and Contents Story about how 'Slioc na Feanaig' [Earra Ghàidheal/Argyllshire] got their name, in that two men found treasure and were to keep it secret but one of them told it to his wife and she told it to the crow. The story is incomplete.

Story entitled 'Creag Earnaig', 1894

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/51
Scope and Contents Story written down by John Ewen MacRury, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula entitled 'Creag Earnaig' describing how Creag Earnaig got its name. The location is described as about two hundred and fifty yards north east of the Female Industrial School Torlum Primary School, Cnoc na Monadh/Torlum, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula]. The stones were once a Danish princess called Earnag, her son and midwife, who had been turned to stone by Earnag's wicked stepmother, who had followed her to Scotland, where she was...

Story entitled 'Cruban Dunan is Baidein', September 1870

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW106/61
Scope and Contents Story entitled 'Cruban Dunan is Baidein' telling of three brothers who were the first people to come to Lios Mòr/Lismore, Earra Ghàidheal/Argyllshire. They came from Ceannloch [Kinloch] and Crùban built Dun Chrubain [Dùn hrùban] and Dùnan and Baidein were to build together on Druim an Dunain [Druim an dùnain] but quarrelled and so Baidein left for Sailean Sligeanach in Benderloch [Sàilean Sligeanach, Meudarloch] where he built his own township, which he called Dun Bhaidein [Dùn Bhaidein]. He...

Story entitled 'Each-drai Chlann Uisne', 16 March 1867

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW114/14
Scope and Contents Story entitled 'Each-drai Chlann Uisne' [Eachdraidh Chlann Uisne] collected from Iain MacNeil [John MacNeil], aged 83 years, cottar, Buaile nam bodach [Buail nam Bodach/Bolnabodach, Barraigh/Isle of Barra]. Carmichael describes him as 'aois 83 co-aois a Chorneil mhic Neil. He appears about 60 years'. The story tells how Seven folios of text have been written over transversely in blue ink, the first text being written in black ink. The blue ink text is a continuation of the story or as...

Story of the origin of the ceard [traveller], 1901

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW110/34
Scope and Contents Story of the origin of the ceard [traveller] that it was because a smith refused to make the nails to crucify Christ that he was the originator of tinkers 'all over the world' [the word ceard meaning both blacksmith and traveller]. The text has been scored through as if transcribed elsewhere.

Story relating to Saint Ronan, 27 October 1873

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW115/5
Scope and Contents Story relating to Saint Ronan probably collected from Angus Gunn, cottar, Dail bho Thuath/North Dell, Nis/Ness, Eilean Leòdhais/Isle of Lewis telling how St Ronan made his way to the island which became Roney [Rònaidh/North Rona] pursued by a wild beast. The story also relates that Ronan built a chapel on the island and that his two sisters followed him there.

Vocabulary note about 'Lonachain', 1895

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW1/62
Scope and Contents Vocabulary note written by John Ewen MacRury, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula about 'Lonachain' that it is the rope from the steps of the loom coming from the Old Gaelic 'Lonan' a rope. Text has been scored through in pencil.

Vocabulary note for 'crianag', 'craobh seargte' and 'seargag', August 1909

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW117/59
Scope and Contents Vocabulary note for 'crianag', 'craobh seargte' and 'seargag' which are used for 'fire wood'. Text has been scored through as if transcribed elsewhere.

Vocabulary note for 'Sgiobal', a barn, 1901

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW110/60
Scope and Contents Vocabulary note for 'Sgiobal' which reads 'Sgiobal = barn, especially barn where tithes are collected as Sgiobhal Skibo in Sutherland [Cataibh] once the seat of the bishop'.