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Murder

 Subject
Subject Source: Library of Congress Subject Headings
Scope Note: Created For = CW

Found in 52 Collections and/or Records:

Story about Airi-na h-aon-oiche, 1871

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW119/20
Scope and Contents Story about Airi-na h-aon-oiche [Airidh na h-Aon Oidhche, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula] telling how the sheiling got its name. A man by the name of MacPhie, who lived in Benbecula had a dog which was very large but never barked and which brought him renown as 'MacPhie a choin duigh' [MacPhee of the black dog]. He and twelve cousins went to build a sheiling on Staireval [Stiaraval] and when they were finished and each lying in their beds 'each said that he wished he had now his leannan with him...

Story about Glenlyon and Gobhainn Innerùidh and accompanying song, 1883

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW120/166
Scope and Contents Story probably collected from Donald MacColl, foxhunter, Glencreran, Earra Ghàidheal/Argyllshire, about [Robert Campbell of] Glenlyon and Gobhainn Innerùidh [the smith of Inverewe] in which the smith fires a shot at Glenlyon, who asks who he is to which the response is that the bullet comes with the blessing of the 'smith of Innar mhuic' [Innerwick/Inbhir Mhuice, Siorrachd Peairt/Perthshire]. The smith is killed and a battle ensues. The song which accompanies the song is 'Bodaich nam Brigais'...

Story about how MacNeil died in Gearrynamoine, 19 October 1871

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW116/168
Scope and Contents Story collected from Rev Alexander Campbell, priest, Bornais/Bornish, Uibhist a deas/South Uist, telling how MacDonald of Boisdale was always trying to catch MacNeil of Barra. One day he and his men lay hidden under heather in the bottom of a boat of women. MacNeil fell for the trap and Boisdale caught him. When they landed at Kilbride [Cille Bhrìghde] MacNeil escaped and so Boisdale and his men pursued him. While they were passing through Gearrynamoine [Geàrraidh na Mònadh/Garrynamonie] 'a man...

Story about murders, a superstition and accompanying place-names, September 1870

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW106/53
Scope and Contents Story about murders describing how in one day seventeen people were killed in Achadun Castle, Lios Mòr/Lismore, Earra Ghàidheal/Argyllshire and that a chàbag 'was a round stone ab[ou]t the buaile which taken away 7 which caused mischance to those who took it. The following place-names are mentioned although it is not clear what the connection between them, the story and the superstition is: Cladh-a ghleannain, Pillebhride, Clachain nam-baintearnan, An Caibeal and Lag a chaibeail [Cladh a'...

Story about Pearsan Mòr, 24 September 1872

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW90/111
Scope and Contents Story about Pearsan Mòr, chaplain and son to MacNeil of Barra, who lived at Ciolla [Chiall, Barraigh/Isle of Barra] that his wife, concerned that he might be interested in a woman who lived at Cliat [Cliaid], arranged for him to be ambushed by the other woman's servants on his return from hunting on Àird Ghrèin at Ciste nan Cli'eann. Pearsan Mòr killed ten of the twelve men although two of them lived until the morning. He fought them until he fell at Meallach where he was buried and a chapel...

Story about Siol Ghorrie [Sìol Ghoraidh] and Siol Mhur[achaidh], 14 July 1870

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW116/99
Scope and Contents Story about Siol Ghorrie [Sìol Ghoraidh] probably collected from Margaret MacDonald, Malacleit/Malaclete, Uibhist a Tuath/North Uist. The story tells how Goraidh was descended from MacDonald of Duntuilm [Dùn Thuilm/Duntulm, An t-Eilean Sgitheanach/Isle of Skye] and Murdoch [Murchadh] from MacDonald of Cinntire [Cinn Tìre/Kintyre]. Mac Suain mor a Raarsai [MacSween of Raasay] killed Goraidh in an attempt to have Trotternish [Tròndairnis] for himself but he failed to get this. There were eighteen...

Story about Siol Mhurchaidh and Siol Ghoraidh, 13 July 1870 to 14 July 1870

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW116/91
Scope and Contents Story about Siol Mhurchaidh and Siol Ghoraidh collected from Ruary MacCoinnich [Roderick MacKenzie], aged 68 years, carpenter, Struan-rua, Malacleit [Sruthan Ruadh, Malacleit/Malaclete, Uibhist a Tuath/North Uist] telling how eighteen families of Siol Ghoraidh lived at Udal and murdered Siol Mhurchaidh while they were resting from ploughing. They put a bonnet on each cas chrom [plough] and Siol Mhurchaidh's wives thought that they were all working until they got close to them and found them all...

Story about the attempted murder of Bishop John Carswell's grandson, 1884

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW120/252
Scope and Contents Story about the attempted murder of Bishop John Carswell's grandson. Carswell's daughter [Cristiane] was married to [Dougall] Campbell of Inverawe, whose brother, Iain Dubh nan Creach, invited her son and heir [Archibald Campbell] to take part in a Christmas Day hunt in Cruachan [Earra Ghàidheal/Argyllshire]. At the feast following the hunt, Iain Dubh put spikes and daggers in the son's seat but Macpherson the gillie warned the son not to sit there but eventually his hound did and was cut to...

Story about the Baron of Bachuil, the Macleans of Duart and and the body of Campbell of Airds/Stewart of Appin, September 1870

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW106/39
Scope and Contents Story about the recovery of the body of Campbell of Airds by the Baron of Bachuil. In the text Carmichael has queried Campbell of Airds as properly being Stewart of Appin. The story tells how Campbell or Stewart was hanged by the Macleans of Duart over the wall of Duart Castle [Caisteal Dhubhairt, Muile/Isle of Mull, Earra Ghàidheal/Argyllshire]. The Baron of Bachuil went to retrieve the body with his two daughters, putting holes in all of Macleans' boats so that they could not pursue them. The...

Story about the Ceathirne-Choill, 6 July 1892

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW126f/2
Scope and Contents Story collected from Duncan Macniven, 'old schoolmaster', Cnoc na h-Aird, Taynuilt [Taigh an Uillt, Earra Ghàidheal/Argyllshire] about the 'Ceathirne-Choill' [ceatharnach-coille or outlaws] and how they were killed with a sword by Fear Bhail an deor [Fear Bhaile an Deòir, Baile an Deòra/Balindore] around an oak beam [sail dharaich] 'because they dwelt in the woods'. Text has been scored through as if transcribed elsewhere.