Skip to main content Skip to search Skip to search results

Poems

 Subject
Subject Source: Sss
Scope Note: Created For = CW

Found in 188 Collections and/or Records:

Poem about Iona taken from The Highlands and Western Isles of Scotland, 1886

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW120/316
Scope and Contents Poem about Iona [Ì Chaluim Chille] taken from The Highlands and Western Isles of Scotland by John MacCulloch which reads 'There never yet came man to I, Who did not come times three'.

Poem about John Morison's dilemma over two jobs, 1874 and 1891

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW108/158
Scope and Contents Poem by John Moireson [John Morison] of Bragar [Eilean Leòdhais /Isle of Lewis] about a dilemma he has in having been asked to do a job in Stornoway [Steòrnabhagh, Eilean Leòdhais /Isle of Lewis] when he was shearing. The poem begins 'Ma theid me ann' and is noted as being a play on words. It is composed of eight lines. An English version of the poem is given beginning 'If I go'.

Poem about pride and poverty, 1874 and 1891

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW108/155
Scope and Contents Poem in Gaelic by John Moireson [John Morison] of Bragar [Eilean Leòdhais /Isle of Lewis] which he recited while helping a neighbour catch a fish in a caraidh (fish-weir) beginning 'Ma sheallas sinn ris an uailse' and its English version which begins 'If it be to pride we look'. The poem is composed of eight lines which have been arranged into two stanzas.

Poem about the burial of a greedy factor, 1874 and 1891

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW108/159
Scope and Contents Poem recited by John Moireson [John Morison] of Bragar [Eilean Leòdhais /Isle of Lewis] about a 'voracious' factor, who had died from choking on food, as his grave was filled in. The poem begins 'Cuiribh air! Cuiribh air!' and the English version given begins 'Heap on him! heap on him!'. It is composed of four lines in each version

Poem about two friends who were separated and accompanying story, 1877

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW108/77
Scope and Contents Poem beginning 'Dàcheann a dh'fàg an t-earrachal', with a note on vocabulary and the background story of two good friends, Iain ic Fhearchair [John MacCodrum] and Mac Aonas Gheobha [Mac Aonghais Ghobha] who went out on the moor, lost each other, one ending up on 'moineach Ebhall' [Eabhal/Eaval, Uibhist a Tuath/North Uist] and the other on 'Cill-èirebhagh, Beinn am faothla' [Cill Eirebhagh/Kilerivagh, Beinn na Faoghla/Benbecula]. The poem is composed of four lines.

Poem addressed to a factor following an argument, 1874 and 1891

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW108/160
Scope and Contents Poem by John Moireson [John Morison] of Bragar [Eilean Leòdhais /Isle of Lewis] addressed to a factor who Morison had invited to his house for dinner but who left before eating as they had argued. The poem begins 'Dh'fhalbh thu ruin 's cha mhiste liom', the English version of which is given as ' Thou hast left nor sorry am I'. The poem is composed of four lines in each version.

Poem begining 'Nigheann Righ Eangain A triuir leannan', c1875

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW106/132
Scope and Contents Poem begining 'Nigheann Righ Eangain A triuir leannan'. The verse has been written out twice, the second time arranging the text in shorter lines.

Poem beginning 'A chorraghritheach mor', 1894

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW122/170
Scope and Contents Poem beginning 'A chorraghritheach mor', Na suidhe air an tom'. The poem is composed of six lines and at the end is a note written in English.

Poem beginning 'Am fac thu each seachad an seo?', 9 April 1901

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW110/1
Scope and Contents Poem beginning 'Am fac thu each seachad an seo?' for the safeguarding of animals, collected from W. M. Thorburn [William MacLeod Thorburn] of Skye, Wellgate, Dundee. Carmichael notes it as being 'Obtained my me from [William] Craigie, Oxford of the Oxford Dictionary'. Text has been scored through as if transcribed elsewhere.

Poem beginning 'An Caolas ad Odrum' and accompanying note, June 1887

 Item
Identifier: Coll-97/CW89/220
Scope and Contents Poem beginning 'An Caolas ad Odrum, Far an caidil na roin' and accompanying note, which states that Caolas Odrum 'between the isle of Heisgeir and the isle of Sheilley, North Uist' [Theisgeir/Heisker and Siolaigh/Shillay, Uibhist a Tuath]. Carmichael also notes that 'Shielly' comes from 'Seal (roin) + ay' and 'Heisgeir from h-aoi isthmus and ey - an isle'.